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Author and historian David McCullough to speak at Columbia College

Columbia, Mo.-Pulitzer Prize-winning author and historian David McCullough will participate in a Question-and-Answer session at 3:30-4:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 6 in Dorsey Chapel, and a lecture at 7:30 p.m. in Launer Auditorium on the Columbia College campus. Both events are free and open to the public.

McCullough's lecture is made possible by the Althea and John Schiffman Ethics in Society Lecture series at Columbia College, which is designed to engage students, faculty, staff and the Columbia community in discussions about ethical issues surrounding contemporary events. McCullough is the fifth speaker in the series.

McCullough attended Yale University where he graduated with honors in English literature. He is the author of several internationally recognized books, including "John Adams," "The Johnstown Flood," "Truman," and the No. 1 national bestseller "1776."

For his work, McCullough has been twice awarded the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award and the Francis Parkman Prize. He also has been honored as winner of the National Book Foundation Distinguished Contribution to American Letters Award, the National Humanities Medal and the New York Public Library's Literary Lion Award.

In addition to his authorship, McCullough has appeared on public television as host of "Smithsonian World" and "The American Experience." He also provided narration for the documentary "The Civil War" and the movie "Seabiscuit."

McCullough is past president of the Society of American Historians and an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Letters. He is the recipient of more than 40 honorary degrees.

Columbia College serves nearly 25,000 students each year at its Day Campus, Evening Campus, Nationwide Campuses, Online Campus and Graduate Studies Program. The college was founded in 1851 as Christian Female College and was renamed Columbia College in 1970 when it became coeducational.

Read more about the Schiffman lecture series.