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Course Descriptions

The following descriptions are applicable to Columbia College courses wherever they are taught. But scheduling information (e.g., "Offered Fall") refers only to Day classes offered on the campus in Columbia unless otherwise noted. If no scheduling information is provided, the courses are offered both Fall and Spring.

The notation G.E. in a course description indicates that the course satisfies a General Education requirement of the College.

Accounting
Aerospace Studies
Art and Graphic Design
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
College Introductory Studies
Communication
Computer and Information Science
Criminal Justice Administration
Economics
Education
English
Environmental Studies
Finance
Geography
Geology
History
Honors
Introduction to Columbia College
Japanese
Journalism
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Military Science
Music
Naval Science
Nursing
Philosophy
Physical Education
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Religious Studies
Social Work
Sociology
Spanish
Tutoring

ACCOUNTING (ACCT)

Business Administration Department

ACCT 280 Accounting I (Financial)     3 hours
Introduction to the principles and concepts of accounting and the application of procedures relating to the complete accounting cycle. Preparation of financial statements for sole proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations is emphasized. Prerequisite: sophomore standing; MGMT 150 and MGMT 152 highly recommended. A grade of C or better is highly recommended before progressing to ACCT 281.

ACCT 281 Accounting II (Managerial)     3 hours
Application of procedures relating to transactions affecting corporations. Interpretation of financial statements for management purposes is emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCT 280 (grade of C or better in ACCT 280 is highly recommended).

ACCT 381 Federal Income Tax-Individuals     3 hours
Focuses on the federal income taxation of individuals. Emphasizes conceptual framework underlying the U.S. tax system as well as tax accounting procedures and federal tax law relating to the preparation of individual tax returns. Prerequisites: ACCT 281 and junior standing. Offered Fall.

ACCT 382 Intermediate Accounting I     3 hours
Development of accounting theory and practice as applied to: the institutional structure of financial accounting; conceptual framework and financial reporting; overview of accounting systems; review of accounting procedures; income statement; balance sheet; statement of cash flows; cash; receivables; valuation of inventories and cost of goods sold; and time value of money. Prerequisite: ACCT 281. Offered Fall.

ACCT 383 Intermediate Accounting II     3 hours
Development of accounting theory and practice as applied to: conceptual framework and financial reporting; acquisition, disposal and depreciation of long-term assets; current and contingent liabilities; long-term liabilities; owners¡ equity-contributed capital and retained earnings. Prerequisite: ACCT 382. Offered Spring.

ACCT 384 Intermediate Accounting III     3 hours
Development of accounting theory and practice as applied to: conceptual framework and financial reporting; complexities of revenue recognition; investments in financial instruments; leases; income taxes; pensions; accounting changes and error correction; and earnings per share. Prerequisite: ACCT 383. Offered Fall.

ACCT 385 Accounting Information Systems     3 hrs
Theory, design and implementation of Accounting Information Systems, including the business application of computerized spreadsheets, databases, and commercial software packages. Prerequisites: ACCT 281, CISS 170. Offered Spring.

ACCT 386 Managerial and Cost Accounting     3 hours
Accounting data and other financial data applied to the management of an enterprise. Cost accounting as a part of the spectrum of manufacturing costs is studied. Particular emphasis is placed on planning and controlling. Prerequisite: ACCT 281. Offered Spring.

ACCT 481 Federal Income Tax--Corporations     3 hours
Focuses on the federal income taxation of corporations and shareholders; corporate formation and capital structure; corporate distributions; corporate liquidations; penalty taxes on corporations; partnerships; S corporations. Prerequisites: ACCT 381 and senior standing. Offered Fall.

ACCT 485 Fund and Government Accounting     3 hours
Study of accounting and reporting concepts, standards, and procedures applicable to city, county, and state governments, the federal government, and not-for-profit institutions. Prerequisites: 9 hrs. of accounting or instructor's permission. Offered odd Fall.

ACCT 488 Advanced Financial Accounting     3 hours
Policies and procedures used in preparing financial statements and reports. Prerequisites: ACCT 382 and ACCT 383. Occasional offering.

ACCT 489 Auditing I     3 hours
Design, installation, and unification of accounting systems and the concepts and procedures used in auditing financial statements. Prerequisites: 12 hrs. of upper-level accounting including ACCT 382 and ACCT 383. Offered Spring.

ACCT 490 Auditing II     3 hours
Focus is on practical application of the conceptual structure of the audit process, risk assessment in the audit process, evidence gathering and evaluation, and special topics to auditing a comprehensive audit case. Prerequisites: ACCT 382, 383, 384, and 489. Offered Spring.

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AEROSPACE STUDIES (AERO)

Offered through the University of Missouri-Columbia. The course-numbering system is the same as that used at the university.

AERO 11 The Foundations of the United States Air Force     2 hours
Introduces the Air Force and Air Force ROTC. Topics include professional appearance, military customs and courtesies, core values, equal opportunity and treatment, officer opportunities, group leadership problems. Applies communicative skills. Leadership Lab.

AERO 12 The Foundations of the United States Air Force     2 hours
Continues introduction to the U.S. Air Force and Air Force ROTC. Topics include Air Force origins organizations, major commands, installations, sister services (Army and Navy), group leadership problems. Applies communicative skills. Leadership Lab.

AERO 21 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power      2 hours
A survey course designed to facilitate the transition from Air Force ROTC cadet to Air Force ROTC officer candidate. Explores Air Force heritage,Air Force leaders, and Air Power doctrine. Applies communicative skills. Leadership Lab.

AERO 22 The Evolution of USAF Air and Space Power     2 hours
Continues the transition from cadet to officer candidate. Expands leadership topics through the use of group leadership problems. Applies communicative skills. Leadership Lab.

AERO 131 Air Force Leadership Studies     3 hours
An integrated leadership and management survey course emphasizing development of the individual as an Air Force leader. Special topics include situational leadership principle centered leadership, corrective supervision and counseling. Leadership Lab.

AERO 132 Air Force Leadership Studies     3 hours
Quality Air Force principles are examined from the foundation developed in Aerospace Studies 131. Ethical decision making, personal core values, and character development are discussed. Military evaluation systems are outlined. Leadership Lab.

AERO 141 National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty     3 hours
Examines the national security process, regional studies, Air Force and joint doctrine. Special topics include the military as a profession, and civilian control of the military. Continued emphasis on communicative skills. Leadership Lab.

AERO 142 National Security Affairs/Preparation for Active Duty     3 hours
Examines civilian control of the military, officership, the military justice system, and current issues affecting military professionalism. Continued refinement of communicative skills. Leadership Lab.

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ART AND GRAPHIC DESIGN (ARTS)

Art Department

ARTS 100 Fundamentals of Artcrafts     2 hours
Craft projects for education majors. $20 lab fee. Occasional offering.

ARTS 101 Art Principles     3 hours
Image formation with media and design applications with emphasis on drawing.

ARTS 102 Summer Arts Workshop     1-6 hours
Occasional offering.

ARTS 103 Desktop Publishing     3 hours
Overview of design for publications and advertising. Basic techniques in computerized layout and desktop publishing will be covered. Offered for students not majoring in art with a graphic design emphasis. Lab fee: $20.

ARTS 104 Introduction to Computer-Assisted Art     3 hours
Introduction to a variety of paint and computer-graphic software packages. Offered Fall.

ARTS 105 Art Appreciation     3 hours
Introduction to the place of visual art in modern society, to the vocabulary used in discussing a work of art, and to a few of the studio techniques artists used to produce two- and three-dimensional works. Occasional offering. G.E.

ARTS 111 Art and Ideas I     3 hours
Survey of world art from prehistoric through medieval periods. Offered Fall. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

ARTS 112 Art and Ideas II     3 hours
Survey of world art from the Renaissance to the present. Offered Spring. G.E.

ARTS 120 Drawing I     3 hours
Life drawing, with emphasis on anatomical drawing. $20 lab fee.

ARTS 130 Painting I     3 hours
Pictorial composition and expression in oils and/or acrylics. Prerequisite: ARTS 101 or instructor's permission. $20 lab fee.

ARTS 140 2-D Design     3 hours
Principles of 2-D design theory and practice. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 101. Offered Fall.

ARTS 141 3-D Design     3 hours
Principles of 3-D design theory and practice. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 101. Offered Spring.

ARTS 150 Creative Photography I     3 hours
Introduction to black and white photography. $20 lab fee. Students supply own cameras.

ARTS 211 Watercolor I     3 hours
Transparent watercolor painting. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 101. Offered Spring.

ARTS 215 Illustration I     3 hours
Introduction to illustration and the media and techniques available. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: sophomore standing; ARTS 101, 120, and 140.

ARTS 216 Graphic Design I     3 hours
Basic course exploring typography and printing production of mechanicals and layouts; page layout on computer is introduced. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and ARTS 101, 120, and 140.

ARTS 222 Drawing II     3 hours
Figure, landscape, and portraiture with varied media. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 120.

ARTS 232 Painting II     3 hours
Continuation of Painting I. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 130.

ARTS 233 Topics     1-3 hours
Occasional offering.

ARTS 242 Color Theory     3 hours
The theory of practical color manipulation and organization. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: sophomore standing; ARTS 101 or concurrent enrollment. Occasional offering.

ARTS 252 Creative Photography II     3 hours
Concentration in 35mm and experimental use of the zone system of photography, color, and viewcamera. $20 lab fee. Students supply own cameras. Prerequisite: ARTS 150.

ARTS 262 Printmaking I     3 hours
Lithography, intaglio, relief, and serigraph printing. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and 120.

ARTS 271 Ceramics I     3 hours
Beginning principles of ceramics open to art majors and non-majors. Emphasis on hand-building techniques. $20 lab fee.

ARTS 281 Sculpture I     3 hours
Development of skills using clay, stone, wood, plastics, and metal. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 141. Occasional offering.

ARTS 290 Art Theory     2 hours
Introduction to the social and philosophical foundations of contemporary art. Prerequisites: ARTS 101 and 111. Occasional offering.

ARTS 292 Jewelry I     3 hours
Jewelry construction using wire and sheet. Open to art majors and non-majors. $20 lab fee plus metal cost. Offered Spring.

ARTS 300 Special Problems     3 hours
Advanced problems in art for approved students who have completed advanced work. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Lab fee related to area.

ARTS 306 Ancient Art History     3 hours
Near Eastern, Egyptian, Greek, Etruscan, and Roman art. Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and 112 or instructor's permission. Offered Fall (2003, 2007). G.E.

ARTS 308 Medieval Art History     3 hours
Art of the Middle Ages. A survey of stylistic artistic developments in the Mediterranean basin and in Western Europe from 300 to 1400 A.D. Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and 112 or instructor's permission. Occasional offering.

ARTS 310 Renaissance Art History     3 hours
Painting, architecture, sculpture of Italy and Northern Europe from 1300 to 1600. Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and 112 or instructor's permission. Offered Fall (2004, 2008)

ARTS 311 Watercolor II     3 hours
Continuation of Watercolor I. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 211. Offered Spring.

ARTS 312 17th- and 18th-Century Art History     3 hours
Painting, architecture, sculpture in Europe during the Baroque and Enlightenment periods from 1600 to 1800. Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and 112 or instructor's permission. Offered Fall (2001,2005).

ARTS 313 Mural Painting     3 hours
Theory, history, and practice of mural painting. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 232 and instructor's permission. Occasional offering.

ARTS 314 Nineteenth-Century Art History     3 hours
History of painting, architecture, sculpture in Europe, 1800 to 1900. Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and 112 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Spring.

ARTS 315 Illustration II     3 hours
Visual problem solving using illustration. Projects relate to the professional illustration field. Students develop advanced techniques. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 215.

ARTS 316 Graphic Design II     3 hours
Introduction to publication design (magazine, newspaper, brochure and book design on the computer). $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 150 and 216.

ARTS 323 Drawing III     3 hours
Advanced problems in drawing. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 222.

ARTS 334 Painting III     3 hours
Continuation of Painting II. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 232.

ARTS 342 Art for Children     2 hours
Study of the theoretical concepts used to develop methods and materials used in art activities with children. Application of principles with various age groups through lessons and units, demonstration materials, and curriculum plans. Cross-listed as EDUC 342. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional offering.

ARTS 343 Advanced Studies in Design I     3 hours
Advanced problems in two- and three-dimensional design. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 101, 140, 141 and 242. Occasional offering.

ARTS 345 Teaching Art     3 hours
Study of the curriculum, teaching strategies, and planning procedures needed by art teachers. The course culminates with a student produced curriculum, teaching unit, and materials budget. Cross-listed as EDUC 345. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of 18 hours (minimum) study in Art. Occasional offering.

ARTS 352 Studio Skills and Art Management     3 hours
Practical experiences and learning designed for art vocations. $20 lab fee. Occasional offering.

ARTS 353 Creative Photography III     3 hours
Continuation of Creative Photography II. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 252.

ARTS 354 Digital Techniques     3 hours
Photographic assignments in fine arts as well as commercial advertising with specific emphasis upon digital imaging. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 150; junior standing.

ARTS 356 Airbrush Techniques     3 hours
Introduction to the airbrush and its fine art and commercial uses. Occasional offering.

ARTS 364 Printmaking II     3 hours
Continuation of Printmaking I. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 262.

ARTS 366 Printmaking III     3 hours
Continuation of Printmaking II. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 364.

ARTS 373 Ceramics II     3 hours
Concentration on ceramic sculpture and wheel-thrown pottery. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 271.

ARTS 374 Digital Techniques II     3 hours
Continuation of Digital Technique I with special emphasis utilizing basic graphic and photographic manipulation such as PhotoShopÎ, FrontPageÎ, etc. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 150 and ARTS 354; junior standing.

ARTS 375 Ceramics III     3 hours
Concentration on production-pottery techniques. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 373.

ARTS 381 Graphic Design Studio     3 hours
Design of commercially generated projects and experience working with clients. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 315 and 316.

ARTS 383 Sculpture II     3 hours
Continuation of Sculpture I. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 281. Occasional offering.

ARTS 385 Sculpture III     3 hours
Continuation of Sculpture II. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 383. Occasional offering.

ARTS 387 Sculpture IV     3 hours
Emphasis on individual directions in sculpture. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 385. Occasional offering.

ARTS 394 Jewelry II     3 hours
Jewelry construction using casting techniques. $20 lab fee plus metal cost. Prerequisite: ARTS 292. Offered Spring.

ARTS 396 Jewelry III     3 hours
Jewelry construction using advanced techniques. $20 lab fee plus metal cost. Prerequisite: ARTS 394. Offered Spring.

ARTS 400 Special Problems II     3 hours
Advanced problems in art for approved students who have completed advanced work. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Lab fee related to area.

ARTS 403 Twentieth-Century Art History     3 hours
American and European painting, sculpture, and architecture from 1900 to the present. Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and 112 or instructor's permission. Offered even Spring.

ARTS 406 American Art History     3 hours
America's early primitive tradition to its leading role in the contemporary art scene. Prerequisites: ARTS 111 and 112 or instructor's permission. Offered Fall (2002, 2006)

ARTS 410 Drawing Other Than Life Studies     3 hours
Experimental use of media with non-figurative drawing. $20 lab fee. Occasional offering.

ARTS 411 Watercolor III     3 hours
Continuation of Watercolor II. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 311. Offered Spring.

ARTS 415 Illustration III     3 hours
Production of a professional portfolio and projects dealing with students' individual interests. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 315 and 316.

ARTS 416 Graphic Design III     3 hours
Packaging, storyboards, corporate design, display advertising, and production of a professional portfolio. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: ARTS 315 and 316.

ARTS 425 Drawing IV     3 hours
Continuation of Drawing III. $20 lab fee. Pre- requisite: ARTS 323.

ARTS 433 Topics     1-3 hours
Occasional offering.

ARTS 435 Printmaking IV     3 hours
Continuation of Printmaking III. $20 lab fee. Pre-requisite: ARTS 366.

ARTS 436 Painting IV     3 hours
Continuation of Painting III. $20 lab fee. Pre-requisite: ARTS 334.

ARTS 445 Advanced Studies in Design II     3 hours
Continuation of Advanced Studies in Design I. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 343. Occasional offering.

ARTS 454 Creative Photography IV     3 hours
Continuation of Creative Photography III. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 353.

ARTS 465 Drawing V     3 hours
Continuation of Drawing IV. $20 lab fee. Pre-requisite: ARTS 425.

ARTS 466 Painting V     3 hours
Continuation of Painting IV. $20 lab fee. Pre-requisite: ARTS 436.

ARTS 476 Ceramics IV     3 hours
Continuation of Ceramics III. $20 lab fee. Pre-requisite: ARTS 375.

ARTS 486 Watercolor IV     3 hours
Continuation of Watercolor III. $20 lab fee. Pre-requisite: ARTS 411. Offered Spring.

ARTS 495 Integrative Seminar 1-3 hours
B.A. and B.S. seniors elect to do a project from one of five categories. Students prepare a plan and scope of the project. Evaluation by Art faculty members. Culminating course for graduation with a B.A. or B.S. degree in art; completion with a satisfactory rating required.

ARTS 498 Jewelry IV     3 hours
Continuation of Jewelry III. $20 lab fee plus metal cost. Prerequisite: ARTS 396. Offered Spring.

ARTS 499 Internship     1-3 hours

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ASTRONOMY (ASTR)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Department

ASTR 108 Introduction to Astronomy     3 hours
A survey of the evolution of Astronomy through the years. Study of the solar system, structure and properties of different planets and galaxies, and instruments used for astronomical observations. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or MATH 106. Offered even Fall. G.E.

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BIOLOGY (BIOL)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Department

BIOL 105 Human Health     3 hours
A study of health, safety, and nutrition and the decisions that are faced throughout a lifetime. Consumer health, mental health, physical health, sex and reproduction, drugs, and death and dying are the major topics covered. Cross-listed as EDUC 105.

BIOL 110 Principles of Biology     3 hours
Fundamental processes underlying biological systems from a cellular and organismal viewpoint. Offered Fall. G.E.

BIOL 110L Biology Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL 110. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 or concurrent enrollment. Offered Fall. G.E.

BIOL 115 Introduction to Environmental Science     3 hours
Survey of environmental science, ecosystems and human impact. Cross-listed as ENVS 115. Offered Spring. G.E.

BIOL 115L Introduction to Environmental Science Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL 115. $20 laboratory fee. Cross-listed as ENVS 115L. Prerequisite: BIOL/ENVS 115 must be taken as a co-requisite, or completed, before BIOL 115L can be used as G.E. credit. Offered Spring. G.E.

BIOL 211 Zoology     5 hours
Survey of animal phyla and vertebrate organ systems. Laboratory. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 or instructor's permission. Occasional offering. G.E.

BIOL 212 Botany     5 hours
Anatomy, physiology, and taxonomy of plants. Laboratory. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 or instructor's permission. Occasional offering. G.E

BIOL 230 Medical Terminology     2 hours
Vocabulary of medical terms. Auto-tutorial. Offered Fall.

BIOL 233 Topics     1-3 hours

BIOL 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study    1-3 hours

BIOL 280 Social Biology     3 hours
Relationship between social behavior and biology. Cross-listed as SOCI 280. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 or sophomore standing. Occasional offering.

BIOL 302 Anatomy and Physiology     3 hours
Structure and function of the human body from an organ system approach. Prerequisite: BIOL 110. BIOL 230 is strongly recommended. Occasional offering.

BIOL 312 Microbiology     3 hours
Survey study of microorganisms. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 312L is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and sophomore standing. Offered Fall and Summer.

BIOL 312L Microbiology Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL 312. $20 lab fee. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 312 is required. Offered Fall and Summer.

BIOL 323 Anatomy     3 hours
Anatomy of the human body, including comparisons with other vertebrates. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 323L is required. Prerequisite: BIOL 110. Offered Fall.

BIOL 323L Anatomy Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL 323. $20 lab fee. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 323 is required. Offered Fall.

BIOL 326 Physiology     3 hours
Functional processes of the human organism with emphasis on regulatory mechanisms. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 326L is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and CHEM 110. Offered Spring.

BIOL 326L Physiology Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL 326. $20 lab fee. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 326 is required. Offered Spring.

BIOL 330 Exercise Physiology     3 hours
Metabolic and physiological processes of the body as they relate to exercise and athletic conditioning. Response of the body to environmental influence and nutritional intake. Effects of gender, aging, and fatigue on athletic performance. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and CHEM 110. Offered even Spring.

BIOL 342 Genetics     4 hours
Basic principles of Mendelian and molecular genetics. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and sophomore standing. Offered Spring.

BIOL 342L Genetics Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL 342. $20 laboratory fee. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and sophomore standing. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 342 is required. Offered Spring.

BIOL 360 Kinesiology     3 hours
Analysis and interpretation of human motion based on anatomical relationships, muscular activity, and biomechanical principles that govern movement of the human body. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and BIOL 323. Offered odd Spring.

BIOL 420 Biochemistry     3 hours
Introduction to basic concepts of biochemistry. Designed to prepare preprofessional and prospective graduate students for later studies. Cross-listed as CHEM 420. Prerequisites: CHEM 303 and BIOL 110. Offered Fall.

BIOL 420L Biochemistry Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory teaching the basics of biochemical experimentation. Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL/CHEM 420. Prerequisite: 6 hours in biology or chemistry completed with a grade of at least a C. $20 lab fee. Cross-listed as CHEM 420L. Offered Fall.

BIOL 433 Topics     1-3 hours

BIOL 490 Senior Seminar     1 hour
A seminar course required as a culminating experience prior to graduation for all seniors majoring in science. Students do research project(s) from the field of natural sciences. A grade of C or better is required. Cross-listed as CHEM 490. Prerequisites: Senior standing and faculty advisor approval.

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CHEMISTRY (CHEM)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Department

CHEM 108 Physical Science Survey     3 hours
Examination of the physical world and its basic underlying scientific principles. Cross-listed as PHYS 108. Prerequisite: MATH 106 or instructor's permission. G.E.

CHEM 108L Physical Science Survey Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement CHEM 108. Cross-listed as PHYS 108L. Prerequisite: CHEM 108 or concurrent enrollment. G.E.

CHEM 110 Chemistry I     3 hours
Fundamental course in the principles of chemistry. Topics include stoichiometry, chemical equations and reactions, properties of gases and solutions, chemical equilibrium, and acid/bases. Prerequisite: MATH 106 or higher with a grade of C or better. Offered Fall. G.E.

CHEM 110L Chemistry I Laboratory     2 hours
An experimental introduction to the physical and chemical properties of matter to complement CHEM 110. $20 lab fee. Offered Fall. G.E.

CHEM 112 Chemistry II     3 hours
A continuation of CHEM 110. Topics to be covered include solubility, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, kinetics, coordination complexes, and a study of elements. Prerequisite: CHEM 110. Offered Spring.

CHEM 112L Chemistry II Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement CHEM 112 to include the qualitative anlysis of compounds. $20 lab fee. Offered Spring.

CHEM 203 Chemistry of Hazardous Materials     3 hours
Study of chemical characteristics and reactions related to storage, transportation, and handling of hazardous materials, i.e. flammable liquids, combustible solids, oxidizing and corrosive materials, and radio-active compounds. Emphasis is on emergency situations and fire fighting and control. Prerequisite: CHEM 110. Occasional offering.

CHEM 233 Topics     1-3 hours

CHEM 301 Quantitative Analysis     4 hours
Standard quantitative chemical analysis covering sample treatment, data development, the basic principles of modern instrumental analysis, properties and theory. Laboratory work is included as part of the course. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: CHEM 112, MATH 150. Offered Fall.

CHEM 303 Organic Chemistry I     3 hours
The first semester of a two semester course that surveys theory, preparations, reactions, and properties of the compounds of carbon, both aliphatic and aromatic. Topics include alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, substitution and elimination reactions, aromaticity, and spectroscopic techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 110. Offered Fall.

CHEM 303L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement CHEM 303 focusing on separation/purification techniques. $20 lab fee. Offered Fall.

CHEM 304 Organic Chemistry II     3 hours
Continuation of CHEM 303 Organic Chemistry I. Topics include groups in organic chemistry such as alcohols, ethers, epoxides, sulfides, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, and amines. Biomolecules will also be covered. Prerequisite: CHEM 303. Offered Spring.

CHEM 304L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement CHEM 304 focusing on synthetic methods. $20 lab fee. Offered Spring.

CHEM 322 Inorganic Chemistry     3 hours
A survey of the inorganic and organometallic chemistry of the elements. Topics include group theory, acid/base chemistry, solid state chemistry, main group elements, coordination chemistry, and organometallic compounds and reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 112. Offered even Spring.

CHEM 330 Environmental Chemistry     3 hours
An analytical survey of factors which affect local and global environments. Prerequisite: CHEM 304. Offered Spring.

CHEM 401 Introduction to Physical Chemistry/Chemical Physics     3 hours
Introduction to quantum mechanics, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Topics include kine-tic theory of gases, gas laws, and thermodynamics. Cross-listed as PHYS 401. Prerequisites: PHYS 111 & 111L; PHYS 112 & 112L or PHYS 211 or 212; MATH 201; CHEM 303 & 303L; or instructor's permission. Offered even Spring.

CHEM 420 Biochemistry     3 hours
Introduction to basic concepts of biochemistry. Designed to prepare preprofessional and prospective graduate students for later studies. Cross-listed as BIOL 420. Prerequisites: CHEM 303 and BIOL 110. Offered Fall.

CHEM 420L Biochemistry Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory teaching the basics of biochemical experimentation. Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL/CHEM 420. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: 6 hours in biology or chemistry completed with a grade of at least a C. Cross-listed as BIOL 420L. Offered Fall.

CHEM 433 Topics    1-3 hours

CHEM 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     1-5 hours

CHEM 490 Senior Seminar     1 hour
A seminar course required as a culminating experience prior to graduation for all seniors majoring in science.
Students do research project(s) from the field of natural sciences. A grade of C or better is required. Cross-listed as BIOL 490. Prerequisites: Senior standing and faculty advisor approval.

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COLLEGE INTRODUCTORY STUDIES (COLL)

College Introductory Studies are skills courses and consist of the following: COLL 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 108, 109, and 277, ESOL 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, and 105; ENGL 107; HNRS 110; INCC 111; MATH 104 and MATH 106. These courses may be used as elective credits toward a degree but do not fulfill general education requirements.

COLL 103 Concepts of Physical Activity and Wellness     2 hours
Basic knowledge, understanding, and values of physical activity and wellness. Offered Fall.

COLL 104 Peer-Advising Skills Seminar-Part I     .5 hour
Assists students in the development of basic skills needed to serve in Resident Assistant, Community Consultant, or Academic Programmer positions. Offered Spring (1st 8 weeks).

COLL 105 Peer-Advising Skills Seminar-Part II     .5 hour
Assists students in the development of basic skills needed to serve in Resident Assistant, Community Consultant, or Academic Programmer positions. This is a continuation of the Peer Advising Skills Seminar-Part I. Offered Spring (2nd 8 weeks).

COLL 106 Strategic Studying Seminar     .5 hour
Designed to help students make the transition to the college setting by enhancing their study strategies. Topics include note-taking, reading textbooks, memory and organizational strategies, and test-taking skills. All students who are admitted by the Admissions Review Committee must enroll in this course during their first semester.

COLL 107 Decision-Making and Career Planning     .5 hour
This course improves student decision-making skills at a crucial point in life. Students perform exercises for self-exploration and discerning values and research employment trends and job markets to make the best match in choosing a career. Occasional offering.

COLL 108 Analytical Thinking Seminar     .5 hour
Students improve analytical-thinking skills using in-class writing, take-home assignments, and group projects; they demonstrate their ability to sort out opinions, to interpret data, to recognize errors of perception, judgment, or reaction, to evaluate judgments, and to express their own opinions clearly and logically. Occasional offering.

COLL 109 Communicating to Our World: An Introduction to Leadership     .5 hour
Modes of communication and their relationship to leadership. Offered Fall.

COLL 225 Tutoring     .5 - 3 hours
Students tutor in specific subject areas. A student earns one elective semester hour for 45 clock hours of tutoring time. The student arranges a tutoring schedule with the supervisor and enrolls in this course after completing the required clock hours for credit. Prerequisite: to be determined by the faculty or staff supervisor of each student enrolling for discipline-specific tutoring.

COLL 277 Study Tour Experiences     3 hours
Occasional offering.

ESOL 100 Academic English I     3 hours
Content-based language instruction for beginning students of English as a second language.

ESOL 101 Grammar and Composition I     6 hours
Grammar and composition course for beginning students of English as a second language. Emphasizes the link between sentence structure and the writing process, as well as the structure of the spoken language.

ESOL 102 Speaking and Listening I     3 hours
Conversational English, social and practical survival skills, listening comprehension, and pronunciation for intermediate students of English as a second language.

ESOL 103 Academic English II     3 hours
Content-based language instruction for advanced students of English as a second language.

ESOL 104 Speaking and Listening II     3 hrs
Academic and conversational English, listening comprehension, and pronunciation for advanced ESOL students. Prerequisite: ESOL 102 or placement in the advanced level of the ESOL Program.

ESOL 105 Grammar and Composition II     3 hours
Grammar and composition course for advanced students of English as a second language. Emphasizes paragraph and essay development. Prerequisite: ESOL 101 with a grade of C or better.

ENGL 107 Developmental English Composition     3 hours
Comprehensive review of basic English grammar and writing skills as preparation for ENGL 111. Grades A, B, C, D, F, U awarded. Grade of C or better is required. Students must repeat the course the succeeding semester if a D, U, or F grade is awarded.

ENGL 107N Developmental English Composition     3 hours
Special class section for non-native speakers.

HNRS 110 Introduction to Honors     3 hrs
Entering freshmen who qualify for the Honors Program are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. It is intended to aid in the transition from high school to college for honors students and to introduce the Honors Program. Prerequisite: Eligibility for Honors Program. Offered Fall.

INCC 111 Introduction to Columbia College     1 hour
Introduction to Columbia College and to the values of learning. The eight-week seminar provides a collaborative learning environment, where the connections between the freshman experience and the academice experience form. Both collegiate goals and social interaction represent significant priorities. The faculty advisor and the student mentor will introduce the general education, academic curriculum, college catalog, student handbook, learning strategies, campus life and extracurricular activities. All freshmen are strongly encouraged to enroll in this seminar during their first semester.

MATH 104 Beginning Algebra     3 hrs
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of algebra. Review of arithmetic skills, skill development in areas of algebraic expression, equations, inequalities, applied problems, polynomials, factoring and rational expressions. Students must repeat the course the succeeding semester if a U, F, or D grade is awarded.

MATH 106 Intermediate Algebra     3 hours
Second course in a three-course sequence in algebra. It covers topics needed to bridge the gap between Beginning and College Algebra. Includes review of factoring and rational expressions. Skill development in the area of graphing linear equations and inequalities; solving systems of equations; radicals and rational exponents; quadratic equations; exponential and logarithmic functions. Students must repeat the course the succeeding semester if a U, F, or D grade is awarded. Prerequisite: A passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam or grade of C or better in MATH 104.

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COMMUNICATION (COMM)

Humanities Department

COMM 110 Introduction to Speech     3 hours
Study of skills needed to function effectively in public communication situations including informative and persuasive speaking. G.E.

COMM 203 Understanding Human Communication     3 hours
Communication theories and models applied to intrapersonal, interpersonal, small-group, and public settings. Principles practiced in verbal and non-verbal forms. G.E.

COMM 213 Arts and Cultures of Our World     3 hours
This course is designed to provide opportunities for students to explore the value of art in their lives and gain a broader understanding of the cultures of the world and the way the arts identify, conserve, celebrate, and transmit cultural values. Occasional offering. G.E.

COMM 220 Theater Production Workshop     3 hours
Study of and participation in various components of theater production including stage work, lighting, costumes, blocking, set-design, and production crew management. Prerequisite: Freshman or sophomore standing. Occasional offering.

COMM 233 Topics 1-3 hours

COMM 303 Intercultural Communication     3 hours
Study of the role of communication in the multicultural and intercultural context including issues relating to values, language, and non-verbal behavior as they relate to effective multicultural and intercultural interaction. Prerequisite: COMM 203. Occasional offering. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

COMM 320 Advanced Theater Production Workshop     3 hours
Study of and participation in various components of theater production including stage work, lighting, costumes, blocking, set-design, and production crew management. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Occasional offering.

COMM 360 Oral Interpretation and Literature     3 hours
Appreciation of poetry, prose, and drama through oral performance. Prerequisite: COMM 110 and/or COMM 203 strongly recommended. offered even Fall.

COMM 393 Organizational Communication     3 hours
Examination of communication processes with emphasis on systems theories, leadership, and interpersonal and group interaction in formal and informal organizational settings. Occasional offering.

COMM 399 Organizational Communication Internship     3 hours
Offered occasionally in conjunction with COMM 393 Organizational Communication.

COMM 403 Seminar in Communication Theory     3 hours
Examination of the nature of communication theory, assumptions underlying theoretical approaches to communication, and survey of themes in contemporary communication theory. Prerequisites: COMM 203, 303. Occasional offering.

COMM 433 Topics     1-3 hours

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COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCE (CISS)

Computer and Information Science Department

CISS 170 Introduction to Computer Information Systems     3 hours
Overview of computer hardware, software, programming, and information systems as applied in the modern business environment. Hands-on applications of word processing, spreadsheet, and data management software are used to explore use of microcomputers in business. G.E.

CISS 175 Microcomputer-Based Personal Productivity Tools     3 hours
Use of microcomputer-based personal productivity software including operating systems, word processing, spreadsheets, and database design. Prerequisite: CISS 170. Occasional offering.

CISS 234 Visual Basic     3 hours
An introduction to programming using Visual Basic. Emphasis is on Visual Basic syntax and creating user interfaces in Visual Basic. Topics include application design, using variables and constants, the selection and repetition structures, sequential access files, menus, dialog boxes and error trapping, random access files, database access and arrays. Prerequisites: CISS 170, MATH 150. Offered Fall.

CISS 238 Java Programming     3 hours
An introduction to programming using Java. Topics include methods, classes, objects, advanced object concepts, input, selection, repetition, arrays and strings, applets, HTML, graphics, inheritance concepts, abstract windows tool kit, file input and output. Prerequisites: CISS 170, MATH 150. Occasional offering.

CISS 240 Introduction to Programming     3 hours
Program design and development using C++. A disciplined approach to problem solving and algorithm development will be stressed using top-down design. Topics include syntax and semantics, input/output, selection, iterative constructs, functions, data types, arrays, strings, pointers, and recursion. Prerequisites: Math 150, CISS 170.

CISS 245 Advanced Programming     3 hours
A continuation of CISS 240. Topics include object-oriented programming in C++ with classes, methods, inheritance, dynamic memory allocation, file streams, linked lists, stacks, and queues. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in CISS 240.

CISS 274 Introduction to Internet Technology and Electronic Commerce     3 hours
Introduction to the Internet and Electronic Commerce. Topics include the World Wide Web, electronic mail, telnet, ftp, discussion lists, newsgroups, information searching and retrieval techniques, and basic web page design and programming methodologies (HTML and CGI). Social, economic, ethical, and political topics will also be discussed. Prerequisite: CISS 234 or CISS 238 or CISS 240. Offered Fall.

CISS 280 Systems Analysis and Design I     3 hours
The first in a two-course sequence (see CISS 320). Explores requirements, and methods for documenting and analyzing existing business information systems; includes investigation and development of alternative solutions. Prerequisite: CISS 234 or CISS 238 or CISS 240. Offered Fall.

CISS 290 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)     3 hours
The organizing concepts of GIS (acquiring, structuring, manipulating, and displaying spatial data) and its applications in business and government. Cross-listed as GEOG 290. Prerequisites: GEOG 101 and CISS 170, or instructor's permission. Occasional offering.

CISS 320 Systems Analysis and Design II     3 hours
A continuation of CISS 280. Explores the design and implementation of information systems, selection of alternatives, object-oriented design techniques, ISO 9001 software quality assurance mechanisms. Prerequisite: CISS 280 with at least a grade of C. Offered Spring.

CISS 345 COBOL Programming     3 hours
COBOL syntax and semantics, data structures including record processing using sequential, indexed, and relative files; sorting and merging files, and other language features. Prerequisite: CISS 245. Offered even Spring.

CISS 350 Advanced Algorithms and Data Structures     3 hours
Advanced concepts of data, storage, organization, and retrieval. Topics include multiple-linked lists, balanced trees, graphs, abstract data types, classes and methods, object-oriented programming, searching and sorting. Prerequisite: CISS 245 with at least a grade of C. Offered Spring.

CISS 355 Directed Study     1-3 hours
Research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept, or application in a selected area of CIS not covered in depth in the curriculum. A term paper documenting the research and results is required. This course requires the approval of the chair of the CIS Department and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisite: CISS 245.

CISS 358 Algorithm Analysis     3 hours
Introduction to algorithm analysis and complexity classes including advanced data structures such as B-trees, height-balanced trees, and graphs. Analysis of various searching and sorting algorithms and algorithm design topics such as dynamic programming, greedy methods, and divide-and-conquer. Prerequisites: CISS 245, MATH 222. Offered odd Fall.

CISS 360 Computer Systems and Assembly Language     3 hours
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of computer systems including data representation, computer arithmetic, Boolean algebra, register-transfer and micro-operations, computer organization, assemblers and assembly language programming. Prerequisite: CISS 245. Offered odd Fall.

CISS 370 Operating Systems     3 hours
The hardware, firmware and software organization of computer systems, basic operating systems concepts, concurrent processes, CPU and disk scheduling, memory management, deadlocks, systems evaluation and simulation, and performance measurement. Prerequisites: CISS 350 or CISS 358. Offered odd Spring.

CISS 375 Compiler Construction     3 hours
Concepts and theories of compiler design and language translation. Lexical analysis, syntax specification, parsing, error recovery, syntax directed translation, semantic analysis, symbol tables, run-time storage. Prerequisite: CISS 350 or CISS 358. Offered even Fall.

CISS 380 Computer graphics     3 hours
Techniques for picture development and transformation, curve and surface approximation and projections, graphical languages, data structures and their implementation, graphical systems, animation techniques. Prerequisite: CISS 350 or CISS 358. Offered odd Fall.

CISS 410 Computer Networks and Communications     3 hours
Network architecture and the OSI model. Physical protocols for data transmission and error detection/correction, data link concepts, LAN protocols, internetworking, end-to-end service and security considerations. Prerequisite: CISS 370. Offered odd Fall.

CISS 420 Computer Architecture     3 hours
Introduces fundamental concepts of computer architecture including data representation, computer arithmetic, Boolean algebra, combinational logic design, sequential circuits, registers and counters, memory and programmable logic devices, instruction set architecture, CPU design, input-output, memory systems. Prerequisites: CISS 245, CISS 360. Offered odd Spring.

CISS 430 Database Systems     3 hours
Design and implementation of hierarchical, network, and relational database systems. Relational algebra, normal forms and normalization, query processing, efficiency and security considerations. Prerequisite: CISS 280. Offered Spring

CISS 433 Topics     1-3 hours
These courses will cover selected topics not offered as part of the CIS curriculum. Prerequisite: Instructor's permission.

CISS 438 Object-Oriented Design and Analysis     3 hours
Introduction to object-oriented (OO) analysis, design, and modeling. Topics include techniques for mapping real-world systems onto an OO representation, use case design, OO methodology for software development, identifying patterns, building conceptual models, and OO implementation issues. The Unified Modeling Language will be used as a modeling tool. Prerequisite: CISS 350 or 358. Offered even Spring.

CISS 445 Programming Languages     3 hours
Survey and comparison of various programming languages and the concepts used in designing and choosing programming languages. Topics include data types, objects, sequence control, data control, storage, and translation. Prerequisite: CISS 350 or CISS 358. Offered even Spring.

CISS 450 Artificial Intelligence     3 hours
Concepts and theories of intelligent computer systems. Issues of perception, learning, problem solving and knowledge representation discussed. Programming in a list processing language will be required. Applications to game playing, theorem proving, expert systems, language understanding. Prerequisite: CISS 350 or CISS 358. Offered even Fall.

CISS 455 Directed Study     1-3 hours
Research project covering a limited and well-focused aspect of theory, concept, or application in a selected area of CIS not covered in depth in the curriculum. A term paper documenting the research and results is required. This course requires the approval of the chair of the CIS Department and is available on the main campus only. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

CISS 465 Software Engineering     3 hours
An introduction to software engineering, software metrics, configuration management, testing techniques and software quality assurance, object-oriented design, human factors, integrated CASE environments. Prerequisite: CISS 350 or CISS 358. Offered even Fall.

CISS 472 Data Warehousing and Decision Support Systems     3 hours
An investigation of data warehousing, data mining, and decision support systems. Topics include design and architectural issues, cost effectiveness, management concerns, data integrity, deployment, and maintenance issues. Prerequisite: CISS 430. Offered Fall.

CISS 493 Information Resource Management     3 hours
Comprehensive overview of information resource management. The structure and role of defined development processes such as the Capability Maturity Model in information technology development and deployment. Required culminating course for graduation as a Computer Information Systems (CIS) major; grade of C or higher required. This course includes a program evaluation component. Prerequisites: CISS 320, CISS 350, CISS 430 and senior standing.

CISS 494 Senior Seminar in Computer Science     1 hour
Culminating experience course required for computer science majors.
Student will prepare and present an original research paper. Grade of C or higher required. Prerequisites: CISS 280, CISS 420, CISS 445, and senior standing.

CISS 499 Internship     3 hours
Application and use of computer knowledge and skills in a supervised work experience. Prerequisites: Senior standing, cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher, and approval of the chair of the CIS Department.

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE ADMINISTRATION

Criminal Justice Administration and Social Work Department

CJAD 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice Administration     3 hours
History and development of major components of the CJ system. Topics include police, courts, prosecution, defense, institutional and community corrections, and the juvenile justice system. Special topics related to each will also be discussed.

CJAD 201 Criminal Investigation     3 hours
Provides the student with a practical working knowledge of criminal investigation principles, techniques, law, and procedure. The investigative process is studied from basic theoretical concepts to the application of elements for prosecution of specific criminal offenses. Includes a study of crime-scene investigation, interrogation, burglary, assault, sex crimes, death cases, homicide and murder, organized crime, and terrorism. Prerequisite: CJAD 101. Offered Fall.

CJAD 203 Crime Scene Investigation     3 hours
Techniques and methods of crime scene investigation focusing on practical suggestions as well as theoretical viewpoints of the field. Topics include fundamentals of the preliminary investigation, identification, protection, and collection of evidence, sketching and photographing the crime scene, interpreting blood stain evidence and fingerprinting techniques. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: CJAD 101. Occasional offering.

CJAD 233 Topics 1-3 hours

CJAD 233 Topics: Mock Trial     2 hours
Available to members of the Columbia College Mock Trial Team. Requires participation beginning in the Fall when the team begins preparing the case through the end of the mock trial season. Cross-listed as POSC 233. Course may be repeated two times. Offered Spring.

CJAD 298 Criminal Justice Practicum I     1 hour
Exposes Criminal Justice majors to agencies and individuals involved in human services. Through field trips, presentations by working professionals, and interviews with clients in the human-service system. Students get an overview of services offered and interaction between criminal justice agencies and social-service agencies. Prereq-uisite: CJAD 101. Evaluation is Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory.

CJAD 301 Criminal Law     3 hours
Examines the basic concepts and elements of substantive criminal law, which defines such crimes as murder, rape, assault, larceny, burglary, and robbery. Analysis of inchoate crimes involving attempt, solicitation, and conspiracy. Analysis of general principles of criminal liability, punishment, and the legal limitations of such liability based on self-defense, necessity, entrapment, diminished capacity, and insanity. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Offered Fall.

CJAD 303 Crime Scene Photography     3 hours
Techniques and methods of crime scene photography focusing on practical suggestions as well as general viewpoints of the nature of micro and macro photography. Topics include fundamentals of photographing the crime scene, general and specific aspects of crime scene photography, aerial photography, and nighttime surveillance photography. $20 lab fee. Students are required to furnish their own 35 mm camera which must have an F-stop. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Occasional offering.

CJAD 306 Military Justice System     3 hours
Relationship between military and civilian systems; community liaison, internal and external problems. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Occasional offering.

CJAD 310 Crisis Intervention     3 hours
This course surveys the current crisis intervention literature and introduces the theories, principles, concepts and techniques of crisis intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to predict who may need crisis intervention services, and demonstrate the provision of first-order crisis intervention. Cross-listed as PSYC 310. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Offered Spring.

CJAD 311 Police     3 hours
Overview and analysis of law-enforcement history, development, purposes, roles and status in a democratic society. Examines critical issues and advances in crime control. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Offered odd Fall.

CJAD 320 Cultural Diversity in Criminal Justice     3 hours
Examination of current issues and social problems relating to the administration of justice in a culturally diverse society. Special focus of the course will be on the changing ethnicity of communities and related changes in social and institutional public policy. Also discussed is a cross-cultural communication, implementing cultural awareness training, multicultural representation in law enforcement, and criminal justice interaction with various racial and ethnic groups. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Strongly recommended as prerequisite for CJAD 345 Ethics and Morality in Criminal Justice. Offered odd Fall.

CJAD 333 Topics: Mock Trial     2 hours
Available to members of the Columbia College Mock Trial Team. Requires participation beginning in the Fall when the team begins preparing the case through the end of the mock trial season. Cross-listed as POSC 333. Course may be repeated two times. Offered Spring.

CJAD 335 Criminalistics     3 hours
Introduction to basic crime scene investigation techniques, covering in detail all aspects of forensic science, the organization of a crime lab, and how evidence is treated from the crime scene to the courtroom. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Occasional offering.

CJAD 345 Ethics and Morality in Criminal Justice     3 hours
Examination of the decision-making process in Criminal Justice as it relates to discretion, due process, truthfulness, corruption and discrimination. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Offered even Fall.

CJAD 350 Corrections and Penology     3 hours
Analysis of punishment in our criminal justice system, with focus on why we punish, and how we punish, all examined within the context of correctional philosophies. History and development of corrections, including relevant theories, practices, systems analysis, and treatment modalities. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Offered even Spring.

CJAD 351 Probation and Parole     3 hours
Examination of the role and function of probation, parole, and the various forms of community corrections and to what extent the task of rehabilitation is becoming realized in society. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and sophomore standing. Occasional offering.

CJAD 398 Criminal Justice Practicum II     2 hours
Students work as volunteers under supervision in a criminal justice agency for a minimum of 100 clock hours. Prerequisite: CJAD 298 or permission of instructor. Evaluation is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

CJAD 405 Laws of Criminal Evidence     3 hours
Analysis of what and why certain testimony, objects, and materials should be admitted into or excluded from consideration at trial. Examines the evolution of laws of evidence, how evidence is admitted, types of evidence, exceptions, privileges, hearsay, confessions and admissions, exclusionary rule, preservation of evidence, expert witnesses, and the trial process. Focus is on ways of obtaining and presenting evidence consistent with the 4th, 5th, and 6th Amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Prerequisites: CJAD 101, CJAD 301, and junior standing. Offered even Spring.

CJAD 410 Drug Abuse and Crime Control     3 hours
Comprehensive examination of the interaction between drug abuse and the criminal justice system. Examines drug pharmacology, drug laws, public policy, and the roles of the police. Prerequisite: CJAD 101 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Spring.

CJAD 413 Bloodstain Evidence     3 hours
A practical-oriented class on the techniques and methods of identifying and interpreting blood spatter evidence. Topics include fundamentals of bloodstain evidence, low-velocity impact and angular bloodstains, medium and high velocity bloodstains, significance of partially dried, clotted, aged, and physically altered bloodstains, and others. Prerequisite: CJAD 101. Occasional offering.

CJAD 415 Criminal Procedures     3 hours
An in-depth study of the procedures utilized in the criminal justice system as they relate to criminal law and the administration of justice. Topics will include issues of how cases arise, the nature of visible and invisible crime, political forces in the justice system, the use of criminal informants, prosecutorial discretion, arraignment and pretrial release, trials, sentencing decisions, and appellate review. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and senior standing. Offered Spring.

CJAD 420 Legal Issues in Criminal Justice     3 hours
An examination of the most current and controversial legal issues in our criminal justice system today. Emphasis on the Constitution and Bill of Rights and the role of the police and courts. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Occasional offering.

CJAD 421 Organized Crime     3 hours
Provides the student with a realistic concept and understanding of the problem of organized criminal activity in the United States. Focuses on theories and the evolution of traditional organized crime in America as well as examining the many new and emerging Organized Crime groups attempting to acquire a stronghold on domestic criminal enterprises. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Occasional offering.

CJAD 433 Topics     1-3 hours

CJAD 445 Forensic Pathology     2 hours
The field of forensic science as it relates to criminal investigation. Topics include investigation of wrongful deaths, suicide, gunshot wounds, blunt trauma, determining time of death, and others. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and junior standing. Occasional offering.

CJAD 451 Management of Criminal Justice Agencies     3 hours
Examines criminal justice agencies within the context of current management principles, organizational theory, and administrative practices. Prerequisites: CJAD 101 and senior standing. Offered even Fall.

CJAD 495 Integrative Seminar     1 or 3 hours
Culminating course for graduation as Criminal Justice or Forensic Science major; completion with a grade of C or better required. Designed to integrate and synthesize all coursework in criminal justice and related areas so the student has a broad conceptual and practical understanding of the criminal justice career field. In addition, it is designed to ensure that the student has a practical understanding of all critical and current issues in the criminal justice field as they relate to the law, law enforcement agencies, criminal courts, corrections and juvenile justice. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 hours of coursework and senior standing.

CJAD 499 Internship in CJ Administration     1-3 hours
Involves working as an intern in an agency under supervision of field instructor. Prerequisites: CJAD 101, GPA of 3.0 in the major, senior standing, and instructor's permission at least one semester prior to the semester in which the internship is taken. Evaluation is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

CJAD 455, 456, 456 Directed Study     1-3 hours

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ECONOMICS (ECON)

Business Administration Department

ECON 293 Macroeconomics     3 hours
Introduction to concepts and theories applicable to a national economy. Prerequisites: sophomore standing; MATH 150 or MATH 170. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

ECON 294 Microeconomics     3 hours
Introduction to specific economic units and to individual markets and individual interactions within an economy. Prerequisites: sophomore standing; MATH 150 or MATH 170. G.E.

ECON 310 Environmental and Resource Economics     3 hours
Application of economic concepts and tools for the analysis of natural resources development and environmental degradation; evaluation of public policies on resource and pollution issues. Cross-listed as ENVS 310. Prerequisites: ECON 293 or ECON 294; ENVS/BIOL 115. Occasional offering.

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EDUCATION (EDUC)

Education Department

EDUC 105 Human Health     3 hours
A study of health, safety, and nutrition and the decisions that are faced throughout a lifetime. Consumer health, mental health, physical health, sex and reproduction, drugs, and death and dying are the major topics covered. Cross-listed as BIOL 105. Offered even Fall and Spring.

EDUC 200 Law, Ethics and Education     3 hours
The study of the legal and ethical issues in education from the contexts of historical, philosophical, social and administrative foundations of the discipline. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Offered Fall.

EDUC 230 Educational Psychology     3 hours
The applied study of psychological principles in educational environments. Emphasis is on the scientific approaches to teaching and learning. Students learn to plan, deliver, evaluate, and report instructional outcomes. Cross-listed as PSYC 230. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Offered Spring.

EDUC 233 Topics     1-3 hours

EDUC 246 Language Acquisition and Development     3 hours
The study of the stages and characteristics of normal language development, as well as those of exceptional children and learners of English as a second language. The course intent is to allow students to apply this knowledge to the acquisition and development of language in various educational settings. Occasional Offering.

EDUC 250 Beginning Field Experience I     1 hour
Pre-service teachers, in their first practicum experience, gain knowledge about teaching through observation and participation in classroom activities. Students are supervised in the field and attend a required concurrent seminar. Successful completion of thirty-five clock hours in the field placement and the seminar yield one hour of credit. Only one field experience may be completed in any eight-week period. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and instructor's permission (must be obtained in the semester prior to taking this course). Evaluation: Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

EDUC 251 Beginning Field Experience II     1 hour
Pre-service teachers, in their second practicum experience, expand knowledge about teaching through observation and participation in classroom activities. Students are supervised in the field and attend a required concurrent seminar. Successful completion of thirty-five clock hours in the field placement and the seminar yield one hour of credit. Only one field experience may be completed in any eight-week period. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: completion of EDUC 250 and instructor's permission (must be obtained in the semester prior to taking this course). Evaluation: Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

EDUC 270 Literature for Children and Adolescents     3 hours
Study of literature for children and adolescents as a literary genre. Students analyze and evaluate selected works of literature including folktales, picture books, poetry, and novels. Prerequisite: ENGL 112. Offered Fall.

EDUC 271 Production and Utilization of Instructional Technology     3 hours
Study of the media materials used in instruction. Hardware, including computers, and software are evaluated and used to produce materials that enhance learning. $20 lab fee. Occasional offering.

EDUC 300 Techniques of Teaching     3 hours
Professional planning of instruction including goals and objectives, techniques and activities, and evaluation. Students produce and present lessons containing defensible techniques, strategies, and methods of evaluation. Prerequisite: EDUC 230.

EDUC 302 Teaching Skills     3 hours
The study of teaching multiple content areas. Students describe, analyze, and critique the content areas of elementary school health, physical education, science and social studies. In each of the content areas, students develop and present micro-teaching lessons, evaluations, and learning centers. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Spring.

EDUC 311 Classroom Management Techniques     3 hours
The study of managing classroom environments. Students analyze classroom variables related to organization and control, and evaluate theories to produce a management system applicable to educational settings. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Fall.

EDUC 322 Educational Measurement and Assessment     3 hours
The study of methods used to develop educational measurements, and the procedures used to globally assess student achievement. Included in the program of study are the development and use of standardized assessments, structured and constructed assessments, observational methods, performance assessment, portfolio assessment, affective measures, and special needs measures. Included also are the historical study of psychometry, the concepts of validity and reliability, referencing methods, and evaluation and reporting methods. Prerequisites: EDUC 230 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Fall.

EDUC 323 Middle Level Education I     2 hrs
The study of middle school philosophy, organization, and curriculum. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Fall.

EDUC 324 Middle-Level Education II     2 hours
The study of middle school curriculum and instructional methods and techniques. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Spring.

EDUC 331 Teaching of Reading     3 hours
The study of how to teach reading skills. Students learn to describe, compare, and contrast theories, models, approaches, and methods of teaching reading. Phonic methods and whole language methods are taught and studied, as are individualized teaching strategies, unique uses of children¡s literature, and writing processes. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Fall.

EDUC 336 Creative and Language Arts in Elementary and Middle Schools     3 hours
The study of creative arts (music, drama and art) and language curricula, including the teaching of writing and oral communications, instructional decisions, teaching techniques and strategies, teaching/ learning materials, and methods related to aesthetic and language arts models of instruction. Students produce various instructional resources, including a thematic unit based on specific knowledge acquired in this course. Prerequisite: EDUC 300. ; admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Spring.

EDUC 338 Teaching Reading in Content Areas and Secondary Schools     3 hours
The study of teaching reading in differing content areas. Students analyze materials in various content areas and demonstrate the ability to use levels of comprehension, patterns of organization and questioning, and vocabulary-building skills. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Fall.

EDUC 342 Art for Children     2 hours
Study of the theoretical concepts used to develop methods and materials used in art activities with children. Application of principles with various age groups through lessons and units, demonstration materials, and curriculum plans. Cross-listed as ARTS 342. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional offering.

EDUC 345 Teaching Art     3 hours
The study of the curriculum, teaching strategies, and planning procedures needed by art teachers. The course culminates with a student-produced curriculum, teaching unit, and materials budget. Cross-listed as ARTS 345. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; admission to the Teacher Education Program and completion of 18 hours (minimum) study in Art. Occasional offering.

EDUC 350 Advanced Field Experience I      1 hour
Pre-service teachers work with cooperating classroom teachers, under the supervision of college professors, assisting with tutorial, small-group, and whole group experiences. The course culminates with one prepared lesson presented by the student. Successful completion of thirty-five clock hours in the field placement and seminar yields one hour of credit. Only one field experience may be completed in any eight-week period. Lab fee: $20. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; instructor's permission (must be obtained in the semester prior to taking this course); and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Evaluation is Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

EDUC 351 Advanced Field Experience II      1 hour
Pre-service teachers work with cooperating classroom teachers, under the supervision of college professors, assisting in tutorial, small-group, and whole group experiences. The course culminates with one prepared lesson presented by the student. Successful completion of thirty-five clock hours in the field placement and seminar yields one hour of credit. Only one field experience may be completed in any eight-week period. Lab fee: $20. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; EDUC 350; instructor's permission (must be obtained in the semester prior to taking this course); and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Evaluation is Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

EDUC 358 Teaching Mathematics in the Elementary and Middle Schools     3 hours
The study of mathematics curriculum. In addition, students explore the relationship between developmental theories and mathematics instruction, and they prepare, present and evaluate math lessons. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Spring.

EDUC 360 Teaching Mathematics in the Secondary School     3 hours
The study of mathematics methods, materials, practices, and curriculum available to secondary mathematics teachers. Students prepare, present and evaluate math lessons. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional Offering.

EDUC 362 Teaching Social Studies     3 hours
The study of methods, materials, practices and curriculum in secondary social studies classes. The course culminates with students demonstrating the abilities to plan, present and evaluate instructional experiences. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional Offering.

EDUC 365 Teaching Science     3 hours
The study of methods, materials, practices and curriculum in secondary science classes. The course culminates with students demonstrating the abilities to plan, present and evaluate instructional experiences. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional Offering.

EDUC 367 Teaching English     3 hours
The study of methods, materials, practices and curriculum in secondary English classes. The course culminates with students demonstrating the abilities to plan, present and evaluate instructional experiences. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional Offering.

EDUC 369 Teaching Business Education     3 hours
The study of methods, materials, practices and curriculum in secondary business classes. The course culminates with students demonstrating the abilities to plan, present and evaluate instructional experiences. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional Offering.

EDUC 372 Environmental Education     3 hours
The study of current issues and methods of instruction in environmental education. Prior philosophy will be used to interpret current issues in environmental education. Cross-listed as ENVS 372. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional offering.

EDUC 380 Diagnostic and Corrective Reading     3 hrs
The study of reading remediation. Students evaluate procedures and demonstrate understanding of standardized tests and informal assessments for diagnosis. Students formulate a theoretical base for choosing diagnostic tools, interpreting evaluative data and identifying corrective strategies. Prerequisite: EDUC 300, EDUC 322 or EDUC 331, and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Fall.

EDUC 390 Education and Psychology of the Exceptional Child     3 hours
The study of teaching children with exceptionalities. Students study the effects of exceptionality on children's cognitive, affective and psychomotor behaviors. Prerequisites: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Offered Spring.

EDUC 391 Child Psychology     3 hours
The study of children from conception to puberty. Students study maturational and environmental factors that shape the physical, cognitive and social development of the child. Cross-listed as PSYC 391. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Offered Fall.

EDUC 392 Adolescent Psychology     3 hours
The study of youth from puberty to young adulthood. Students study maturational and environmental factors that shape the physical, cognitive, and social development of the youth. Special emphasis is focused on the transescent stage of development. Cross-listed as PSYC 392. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Offered Spring.

EDUC 400 Senior Seminar      1 hour
Seminar required for all education majors. The course culminates with a professional portfolio which demonstrates competency in major areas of theory and practice. The portfolio must be successfully presented at an exit exhibition. A minimum grade of ÀC” is required for graduation. Prerequisites: Teacher Education Program admission; senior standing.

EDUC 420 Student Teaching in the Elementary School     4-8 hrs
Students, under the guidance of college supervisors and qualified classroom teachers, assume the duties and responsibilities of public elementary school teachers including planning, presenting and evaluating instruction and related responsibilities (10 weeks). The course seminar is required. Lab fee: $20. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission (must be obtained one semester before beginning student teaching); senior standing and admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 422 Student Teaching in the Secondary School      4-8 hrs
Students, under the guidance of college supervisors and qualified classroom teachers, assume the duties and responsibilities of public secondary school teachers including planning, presenting and evaluating instruction and related responsibilities (10 weeks). The course seminar is required. Lab fee: $20. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission (must be obtained one semester before beginning student teaching); senior standing and admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 424 Student Teaching in the Middle School      4-8 hrs
Students, under the guidance of college supervisors and qualified classroom teachers, assume the duties and responsibilities of public middle school teachers including planning, presenting and evaluating instruction and related responsibilities (10 weeks). The course seminar is required. Lab fee: $20. Prerequisites: Instructor's permission (must be obtained one semester before beginning student teaching); senior standing and admission to the Teacher Education Program.

EDUC 433 Topics     1-4 hours

EDUC 499 Internship     1-9 hours
The objective of internship is to obtain practical experience in appropriate educational (non-school and school) settings. Forty-five clock hours of experience are required for 1 semester hour. Prerequisites: EDUC 300; admission to the Teacher Education Program; instructor's permission (must be obtained one semester before beginning the internship).

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ENGLISH (ENGL)

Humanities Department

ESOL = English as a Second or Other Language

ESOL 100 Academic English I     3 hours
Content-based language instruction for intermediate students of English as a second language.

ESOL 101 Grammar and Composition I     6 hours
Grammar and composition course for intermediate students of English as a second language. Emphasizes the link between sentence structure and the writing process, as well as the structure of the spoken language.

ESOL 102 Speaking and Listening I     3 hours
Conversational English, social and practical survival skills, listening comprehension, and pronunciation for intermediate students of English as a second language.

ESOL 103 Academic English II     3 hours
Content-based language instruction for advanced students of English as a second language.

ESOL 104 Speaking and Listening II     3 hrs
Academic and conversational English, listening comprehension, and pronunciation for advanced ESOL students. Prerequisite: ESOL 102 or placement in the advanced level of the ESOL Program.

ESOL 105 Grammar and Composition II     6 hours
Grammar and composition course for advanced students of English as a second language. Emphasizes paragraph and essay development. Prerequisite: ESOL 101 with a grade of C or better.

ENGL 107N Developmental English Composition     3 hours
Special class section for non-native speakers. Comprehensive review of basic English grammar and writing skills as preparation for ENGL 111. Grade of C or better is required. Students must repeat the course in the succeeding semester if a D, U, or F grade is awarded.

ENGL 107 Developmental English Composition     3 hrs
Comprehensive review of basic English grammar and writing skills as preparation for ENGL 111. Grade of C or better is required. Students must repeat the course in the succeeding semester if a D, U, or F grade is awarded. Section N designed for non-native speakers.

ENGL 111 English Composition I     3 hours
Expository writing to practice traditional rhetorical modes and strategies, to increase analytical clarity, and to achieve precise expression. Grade of C or better required. Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in ENGL 107 or placement by diagnostic essay.

ENGL 112 English Composition II     3 hours
Continued practice of expository writing applied to literary analysis of fiction, drama and poetry culminating in a research paper. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in ENGL 111. Grade of C or better required. G.E.

ENGL 123 Introduction to Mythology and Folklore     3 hours
Study of mythologies of various cultures, especially ancient Greek and Roman, but including Norse, Indian, Oriental, African, and Native American. Offered even Fall and Spring. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

ENGL 124 The Bible as Literature     3 hours
A literary and historical approach to major Biblical selections and their influence on Western literature. Occasional offering.

ENGL 132 Introduction to Shakespeare     3 hours
Beginning study of Shakespeare as a playwright. Offered Fall (2003, 2007).

ENGL 190 The Short Story     3 hours
Introduction to the study of fiction through the short story. Offered odd Spring. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

ENGL 193 Best Sellers and Literature     3 hours
Study of major literary works that were popular in their time. Occasional offering.

ENGL 201 Exposition and College Grammar     3 hours
Study of grammar and practice in writing expository prose. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or grade of C or better in ENGL 112. Offered even Fall.

ENGL 204 Technical Writing     3 hours
Study of grammar and practice in writing clear reports. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or sophomore standing. Occasional offering.

ENGL 207 Creative Writing I - Fiction     3 hours
Writing of short fiction; includes class criticism of student and professional work. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Fall and even Spring.

ENGL 208 Creative Writing II - Poetry     3 hours
Writing of poetry, including class criticism of student and professional work. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered Spring (2005).

ENGL 210 Introduction to Fiction     3 hours
A comprehensive introduction, within the traditional canon, to the elements and major writers of fiction of varying lengths. Offered even Fall. G.E.

ENGL 211 Introduction to Poetry     3 hours
A comprehensive introduction, within the traditional canon, to the elements and major writers of poetry of varying lengths. Offered odd Fall and Spring. G.E.

ENGL 212 Introduction to Drama     3 hours
A comprehensive introduction to the elements and major writers of drama of varying lengths. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered even Spring. G.E.

ENGL 231 English Literature I     3 hours
Survey from Beowulf to late Eighteenth-Century British writers. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Fall. G.E.

ENGL 232 English Literature II     3 hours
Survey from Romantic period to present. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered even Spring. G.E.

ENGL 233 Topics     1-3 hours

ENGL 241 American Literature I     3 hours
Survey of major American writers from Colonial to Realist figures. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered even Fall. G.E.

ENGL 242 American Literature II     3 hours
Survey of American writers from Realist to Contemporary figures. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Spring. G.E.

ENGL 263 World Literature I     3 hours
European (non-British) and Asian literature from their origins to the Fourteenth Century. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Fall. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

ENGL 264 World Literature II     3 hours
Significant European (non-British) and Asian literature from the Fourteenth Century to the present. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered even Spring. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

ENGL 280 Film and Literature     3 hours
Critical viewing of international films and study of relationships between film and literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission. Offered Fall (2002). G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

*ENGL 310 Seminar in Advanced Writing     3 hours
Course work may focus on creative writing or on nonfiction. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 204, 207, or 208. Offered even Spring and odd Fall (2003, 2007).

ENGL 311 The English Language I (Grammar and Usage)     3 hours
Study of the grammar (sounds, structures, sentences and dialects) of American English. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor's permission. Offered odd Fall.

ENGL 312 The English Language II (History and Theory)     3 hours
Study of the history and dialects of the English Language. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered even Spring.

ENGL 323 The Hero in Mythology     3 hours
Study of the hero in mythology from a cross-cultural perspective. Emphasizes examining, defining, and discussing the hero from a cross-cultural, mythological perspective and determining the hero¡s role in society today. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor¡s permission. Occasional offering. Course meets World/Eastern Cultural graduation requirement.

ENGL 331 Ethical Issues in Literature     3 hrs
Analysis and evaluation of ethical issues and concerns depicted in the literacy works of major international authors. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered Fall. G.E.

ENGL 346 Environmental Issues in Native American Literature     3 hours
Readings in Native American fiction, drama, and poetry, with emphasis on environmental content and issues. Cross-listed as ENVS 346. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered even Spring.

*ENGL 350 Major Literary Figures     3 hours
Study of the works of one-to-three major writers (e.g., Chaucer, Mark Twain, Faulkner, Cervantes, or Melville and Whitman, Donne and Milton, Dante and Goethe, etc.). Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered Fall (2002) and Spring (even and 2003).

ENGL 351 Readings in Shakespeare     3 hours
Advanced study of William Shakespeare, emphasizing his background, his poetry and his plays in all genres. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered Spring.

*ENGL 360 Readings in the Novel     3 hours
Study of major literary development and achievement in the genre, possibly from a special perspective (e.g., American novel, the contemporary novel, the comic novel). Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered Fall (2002, 2006).

*ENGL 361 Readings in Poetry     3 hours
Study of major literary development and achievement in the genre, possibly from a special perspective (e.g., American poetry, Renaissance poetry, epic poetry). Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered Fall (2002, 2006).

*ENGL 362 Readings in Drama     3 hours
Study of major literary development and achievement in the genre, possibly from a special perspective (e.g., Protest drama, the comic grotesque, formal evolution and revolution). Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered Spring (2005).

*ENGL 370 Major Literary Periods     3 hours
Study of the major literary works from a specific movement or definitive age (Medieval or Renaissance Literature, the Age of Reason, the Romantic Age, Victorian Literature, Modern Literature or Contemporary Literature). Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered odd Fall and Spring (odd and 2004).

ENGL 397 Science Fiction and Fantasy     3 hours
Readings from a broad spectrum of science fiction and fantasy literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Occasional offering.

ENGL 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     1-3 hours

ENGL 431 Senior Essay     3 hours
Essay research project arranged in conjunction with one or more of the English faculty. For English majors, the project should address some problem, theme, or issue in English, American or World Literature. Possible topics can be such issues as treatment of class, images of gender, the role of Nature, philosophical analyses, matters of culture, changing nature of the hero, etc. Must be completed with a grade of C or better. With the instructor¡s permission, a student not majoring in English may enroll and propose a project specific to her or his discipline. Culminating course for graduation as an English major. Prerequisite: English faculty acceptance; 68 semester hours; C average in English courses; for non-English majors, advisor¡s endorsement. Offered Fall.

ENGL 433 Topics 1-3 hours

ENGL 450 Minority and Ethnic Literature of the United States     3 hours
Significant and representative works by minority and ethnic writers (black, Hispanic, Native American, Asian, Jewish, etc.) of the United States. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered Fall (2005).

ENGL 490 Approaches to Interpreting Literature     3 hours
Introduction to methods of literary criticism and their application. Prerequisites: ENGL 112; junior standing and 3 hours of literature, or instructor's permission. Offered odd Spring.

ENGL 499 Writing Internship 1-3 hours
Prerequisite: senior standing and departmental approval.

*ENGL 310, 350, 360, 361, 362, and 370 may be taken more than once when the subject matter in the course varies.

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ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (ENVS)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Department

ENVS 115 Introduction to Environmental Science     3 hours
Survey of environmental science, ecosystems and human impact. Cross-listed as BIOL 115. Offered Spring. G.E.

ENVS 115L Introduction to Environmental Science Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement BIOL 115. $20 laboratory fee. Cross-listed as BIOL 115L. Prerequisite: BIOL/ENVS 115 must be taken as a corequisite, or completed before ENVS 115L can be used as G.E. credit. Offered Spring. G.E.

ENVS 220 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences     3 hours
An introduction to the study of weather and climate. Cross-listed as GEOG 220. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered odd Spring.

ENVS 223 Environmental Hazards     3 hours
Introduction to environmental hazards and disasters. Emphasis on causes of extreme natural events, their geographic distribution, and human responses/adjustments. Cross-listed as GEOG 223. Prerequisite: GEOG 101. Offered odd Fall.

ENVS 251 Resource Management     3 hours
An introduction to the global range of natural resources, the economic and political contexts of their development, and the resulting physical and societal impacts. Cross-listed as GEOG 251. Prerequisite: GEOG 101. Offered even Fall.

ENVS 272 An Introduction to Environmental Literature     3 hours
An introduction to contemporary writings about environmental issues. Exposure to aspects of environmental crisis and policy, to recent first-person nature writing, and to novels that examine various ecological visions. Prerequisite: ENGL 112. Offered even Fall.

ENVS 310 Environmental and Resource Economics     3 hours
Application of economic concepts and tools for the analysis of natural resources development and environmental degradation; evaluation of public policies on resource and pollution issues. Cross-listed as ECON 310. Prerequisites: ECON 293 or ECON 294; ENVS/BIOL 115. Occasional offering.

ENVS 346 Environmental Issues in Native American Literature     3 hours
Readings in Native American fiction, drama, and poetry, with emphasis on environmental content and issues. Cross-listed as ENGL 346. Prerequisites: POSC 112; junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered even Spring.

ENVS 352 American Environmental History     3 hours
Analysis of the relationship between Americans and the natural environment from the Colonial period to the present. The course traces American Indian ecology, European agricultural colonization, natural resource development, and modern environmental movements. Cross-listed as HIST 352. Occasional offering.

ENVS 372 Environmental Education     3 hours
Current issues and methods of instruction in environmental education will be introduced and studied. Prior philosophy will be used to interpret current issues in environmental education. Cross listed as EDUC 372. Prerequisite: EDUC 300 and admission to the Teacher Education Program. Occasional offering.

ENVS 390 Culminating Experience in Environmental Studies     1 hour
Final culminating project arranged in conjunction with one or more of the Environmental Studies faculty. This project may take the form of library or lab research, a field experience or internship, or a creative project. The project should demonstrate a synthesis of ideas from the ENVS minor. The course must be completed with a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: Completed at least 12 hours toward the Environmental Studies minor.

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FINANCE (FINC)

Business Administration Department

FINC 295 Risk and Insurance     3 hours
Basic concepts and practices found in modern insurance and other methods of handling risk. Occasional offering.

FINC 298 Personal Financial Planning     3 hours
Provides knowledge that helps non-business and business students effectively manage their personal financial affairs. Topics include personal financial statements, budgeting, tax planning, investing and savings, insurance, real estate and retirement planning. Offered Spring.

FINC 350 Business Finance     3 hours
A study of the finance function in corporate decision-making. Topics include financial statement analysis, risk and return, valuation, cost of capital, working capital management, time value of money, and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ACCT 281; MATH 150 or MATH 170.

FINC 354 Investments     3 hours
An introductory investment course designed to teach students how to make personal investing decisions for their own investment portfolio with special consideration given to the management of employer-sponsored retirement plans. Prerequisite: ACCT 281 or instructor's permission. Offered Fall.

FINC 395 Financial Markets and Institutions      3 hours
Examination of the risks faced by managers of financial institutions and the methods and markets through which these risks are managed. Consideration is given to a wide array of financial institutions including commercial banks, credit unions, investment banks, securities firms, insurance companies and investment companies. Prerequisites: ACCT 281, MATH 150 or MATH 170. Occasional offering.

FINC 396 Corporate Finance     3 hours
Analysis of financial and accounting information and its impact on financial decision-making and profit planning. Topics include: financial planning and control tools, leverage and capital structure, investment banking, dividend policy, corporate restructuring, risk management and international financial management. Prerequisites: ACCT 281; MATH 150 or MATH 170. Offered even Spring.

FINC 397 Principles of Real Estate     3 hours
An introduction to the principles and practices of real estate. Topics include the real estate profession and industry, home ownership, real estate financing, real estate appraisal, real estate contracts, and real estate investment as it relates to personal financial planning objectives. Offered odd Spring.

FINC 495 International Finance     3 hours
Understanding and application of the concepts of corporate finance, financial markets, and investments in an international context. Specific topics include an overview of the international monetary system, international financial markets (currency, equity and bond markets), the "parity conditions" of international finance, foreign exchange risk management, global investing, international capital budgeting, and global working capital management. Prerequisite: FINC 350. Offered Fall.

FINC 496 Financial Management     3 hours
Application of various financial management decision-making techniques as they apply to complex business problems. Prerequisite: FINC 396. Occasional offering.

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GEOGRAPHY (GEOG)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Department

GEOG 101 Introduction to Geography     3 hours
Introduction to the distribution of people, activities, and environments around the world; geographic patterns and the interaction of humans with their surroundings are emphasized. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

GEOG 210 United States and Canada     3 hours
National and Continental patterns of and regional differences in environment, population, economics, and politics in the United States and Canada. Offered odd Spring.

GEOG 220 Introduction to Atmospheric Sciences     3 hrs
An introduction to the study of weather and climate. Cross-listed as ENVS 220. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or instructor¡s permission. Offered odd Spring

GEOG 223 Environmental Hazards     3 hours
Introduction to environmental hazards and disasters. Emphasis on causes of extreme natural events, their geographic distribution, and human responses/adjustments. Cross-listed as ENVS 223. Prerequisite: GEOG 101. Offered odd Fall.

GEOG 233 Topics    1-3 hours

GEOG 251 Resource Management     3 hours
Introduction to the global range of natural resources, the economic and political contexts of their development, and the resulting physical and societal impacts. Cross-listed as ENVS 251. Prerequisite: GEOG 101. Offered even Fall.

GEOG 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     1-3 hours
Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

GEOG 290 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)     3 hours
The organizing concepts of GIS (acquiring, structuring, manipulating, and displaying spatial data) and its applications in business and government. Cross-listed as CISS 290. Prerequisites: GEOG 101 and CISS 170, or instructor's permission. Occasional offering.

GEOG 302 Urban Geography     3 hours
Study of the city as a part of the human environment. Patterns of land use, ethnic groups, and transport in the city and changes in these patterns are analyzed. The locations, economic bases, and relationships among urban systems are also covered. Occasional offering.

GEOG 313 Political Geography     3 hours
Spatial aspects of power, decision-making, and authority including the political organization of territory, regionalism and supranationalism. Cross-listed as POSC 313. Prerequisites: POSC 111 or POSC 215; GEOG 101; or instructor¡s permission. Offered even Spring.

GEOG 433 Topics

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GEOLOGY (GEOL)

Natural Sciences and Mathematics Department

GEOL 110 Introduction to Geology: Physical and Historical Geology     5 hours
Introduction to the study of the earth's materials, natural processes affecting them, resulting landforms, and the history of the earth. $20 lab fee. G.E.

GEOL 202 Geology of the National Parks     3 hours
Advanced course using the National Parks of the United States to illustrate the results of geologic processes. Prerequisite: GEOL 110. Occasional offering. G.E.

GEOL 233 Topics      1-3 hours

GEOL 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     1-3 hours
Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

GEOL 301 Historical Geology     3 hours
History of planet Earth from its origin to the present, including development of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere. Prerequisite: GEOL 110. Occasional offering. G.E.

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HISTORY (HIST)

History and Social Sciences Department

HIST 101 Western Civilization I     3 hours
Western history in global perspective to 1715. G.E.

HIST 102 Western Civilization II     3 hours
Western history in global perspective after 1715. G.E.

HIST 121 American History to 1877     3 hours
A survey of political, cultural, and social relationships in American history from colonization to reconstruction. Offered Fall. G.E.

HIST 122 American History Since 1877     3 hours
A survey of political, cultural, and social relationships making American history from reconstruction to the present. Offered Spring. G.E.

HIST 231 Imperial Russia     3 hours
Russian history from the founding of Kiev to the death of Alexander I, with emphasis on Kiev, the Mongols, Russian Orthodoxy, Time of Troubles, the Romanovs, Catherine the Great, Peter the Great, Napoleon and the beginning of the revolutionary tradition. Offered odd Fall. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

HIST 232 History of Russia 1825 to Present     3 hours
Major historical developments from the death of Alexander I through the coming of Marxism, the Revolution of 1917, Stalin, the Great Patriotic War, the Cold War, to the Commonwealth of Independent States. Offered even Spring.

HIST 233, 333, 433 Topics     3 hours
Selected courses approved by the History and Social Sciences Department for history credit.

HIST 250 Missouri History      3 hrs
Survey of Missouri¡s development from colonization to the present. Occasional offering.

HIST 303 History and Philosophy of Modern Science     3 hours
Evolution of scientific thought from 1600 A.D. to the present. Cross-listed as PHIL 303. Prerequisite: HIST 102. Offered odd Spring.

HIST 312 Twentieth Century American Diplomatic History     3 hours
Diplomacy since 1890s and emergence as a world power. Occasional offering.

HIST 314 Modern China     3 hours
Chinese history since 1800. Prerequisite: 3 hours of history (HIST 102 preferred). Offered even Spring. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

HIST 316 Modern Japan     3 hours
Japanese history since 1600 with emphasis on 1868 to the present. Prerequisite: 3 hours of history (HIST 102 preferred). Offered odd Spring. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

HIST 321 History of the Modern U.S.     3 hours
Analysis of the modern United States between the World Wars. The course explores the story of how Americans endured the Great Depression and eventually prevailed in their struggle against totalitarianism. It underscores the transformation of American society after the Great War, the cultural movements of the new era, the New Deal policies of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the military campaigns of World War II. Significant themes of gender, class, power and warfare will be traced from 1920 to 1945. Prerequisite: HIST 122 or instructor¡s permission. Occasional offering.

HIST 331 Contemporary Europe     3 hours
Political, social, economic, cultural development of Europe from 1919 to present. Offered even Fall.

HIST 340 Philosophy of Revolution     3 hours
Examination of the nature of revolution-intellectual, economic, and political. Cross-listed as PHIL 340. Offered Spring.

HIST 342 American Civil War     3 hours
Analysis of the American Civil War during the nineteenth century. The course examines the causes and the consequences of the sectional conflict between the North and the South. In particular, it examines the politics of slavery, the disintegration of the federal union, the campaigns of the military and the struggle for reconstruction. Finally, issues of constitutional, economic and social justice will be considered. Prerequisite: HIST 121 or instructor's permission. Offered Spring.

HIST 350 American Revolution     3 hours
Analysis of the American Revolution during the eighteenth century. The course evaluates the causes and the consequences of the colonial rebellion against the British Empire in North America. Furthermore, it assesses the preconditions, constraints and outcomes of the struggle for independence. Particular attention will be given to the clash of values, interests and ambitions transforming the thirteen colonies into the United States. Moreover, significant themes of cultural, economic, military, diplomaticand political conflict will be explored. Prerequisite: HIST 121 or instructor's permission. Offered Fall.

HIST 352 American Environmental History     3 hours
Analysis of the relationship between Americans and the natural environment from the Colonial period to the present. The course traces American Indian ecology, European agricultural colonization, natural resource development and modern environmental movements. Cross-listed as ENVS 352. Occasional offering.

HIST 362 History of the American West     3 hours
Analysis of the American West from colonization to the present. This course traces the imperial, commercial, intellectual and social relationships forming the trans-Mississippi region. In particular, it appraises a region inhabited by peoples of diverse backgrounds interacting with each other over the course of generations. Furthermore, it examines the contests between and among them to direct the development of an imagined frontier. Finally, attention will be focused upon the processes whereby the frontier became increasingly entangled with the modern world. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor's permission. Offered Fall.

HIST 371 History of American Business     3 hours
Analysis of the enterprise system from the Colonial period to the present. The course traces significant entrepeneurs, innovative firms and political economy affecting the organization of corporate America. Cross-listed as MGMT 371. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Occasional offering.

HIST 372 History of Ethnic America     3 hours
Analysis of the dynamic of ethnicity from the Colonial period to the present. The course traces the historical patterns of immigration, discrimination and multiculturalism across the United States. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Occasional offering.

HIST 381 History of Christianity, The Early Church     3 hours
Development of Christianity from its origins to the eve of the Reformation. Emphasis is on the evolution of theology within the context of Western civilization. Specific subjects include ancient Hebrew thought, Hellenism, gnosticism, the historical Jesus, the Trinity, Augustine, medieval theology, heresies, etc. Prerequisite: HIST 101. Offered odd Fall.

HIST 382 Christianity in the Modern World     3 hours
Development of Christian thought from the late Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis is on the confrontation of Christian theology with modernity. Specific subjects are: the Reformation, Counter-Reformation, the scientific revolution, the Enlightenment, Liberal Theology, the Theology of Crisis, etc. Prerequisite: HIST 102. Offered even Spring.

HIST 399 Internship     1-12 hours
Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

HIST 433 Topics     1-3 hours

HIST 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 456, 457 Directed Study 1-3 hours

HIST 490 Historiography     3 hours
Study of great historians, their work, and their significance. Prerequisite: 3 previous courses in history. Occasional offering.

HIST 494 Historical Research and Methods     3 hours
The culminating course for graduation as a History major; completion with a grade of C or higher is required.
Prerequisite: three previous courses in history. Offered Spring.

HIST 499 Internship 1-12 hours
Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

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HONORS (HNRS)

HNRS 110 Introduction to Honors     1 hour
Entering freshmen who qualify for the Honors Program are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. It is intended to aid in the transition from high school to college for honors students and to introduce the Honors Program. Prerequisite: Eligibility for Honors Program. Offered Fall.

HNRS 111 Introduction to Honors II     2 hours
Freshmen who qualify for the Honors Program are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. Each course will be based on a theme determined by the Honors Council. The instructor will help students choose a research topic addressing this theme. The semester will be spent researching, writing, and discussing the research. Prerequisite: Eligibility for Honors Program. Offered Spring.

HNRS 310 Honors Service      1 hour
All students participating in the Honors Program must complete this course prior to graduation. Students must design a community service activity, choose a professor to direct that activity, and perform the project. Requires 45 hours of service activity. Prerequisite: Eligibility for Honors Program.

HNRS 484 Honors     3 hours
Open to students who have been accepted as candidates for degrees with Distinction and who are registering for their final semester.

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Introduction to Columbia College (INCC)

Freshman Experience

INCC 111 Introduction to Columbia College     1 hour
Introduction to Columbia College and to the values of learning. The eight-week seminar provides a collaborative learning environment, where the connections between the freshman experience and the academic experience form. Both collegiate goals and social interaction represent significant priorities. The faculty advisor and the student mentor will introduce the general education, academic curriculum, college catalog, student handbook, learning strategies, campus life, and extracurricular activities. All freshmen are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course during their first semester.

HNRS 110 Introduction to Honors     1 hr
Entering freshmen who qualify for the Honors Program are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course. It is intended to aid in the transition from high school to college for honors students and to introduce the Honors Program. Prerequisite: Eligibility for Honors Program. Offered Fall.

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JAPANESE (JAPA)

Humanities Department

JAPA 101 Beginning Japanese I     2 hours
Introduction to basic words, phrases, and sentences useful for travelers. Occasional offering.

JAPA 102 Beginning Japanese II     2 hours
Continuation of JAPA 101. Occasional offering.

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JOURNALISM (JOUR)

Humanities Department

JOUR 101, 201, 301, 401 Newspaper Production     3 hours
News writing, design layout, copy editing, and photography. The College newspaper is produced by students in journalism courses. Offered Fall.

JOUR 102, 202, 302, 402 Newspaper Production     3 hours
Continuation of JOUR 101, 201, 301, 401. Offered Spring.

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MANAGEMENT (MGMT)

Business Administration Department

*Denotes a course that may carry any business administration code.

MGMT 150 Introduction to Business     3 hours
Comprehensive survey of the major areas of business and its environment. Concepts, issues, and vocabulary are emphasized.

MGMT 152 Business Mathematics     3 hours
Development of an understanding of and skill in using arithmetic calculations in business-oriented problems. Offered Spring.

(*) 233 Topics      1-3 hours
Specialized inquiry into topics not covered in the curriculum.

MGMT 254 Business Communication     3 hours
Development of written and oral skills for effective communication in the business world. Emphasis on clear, effective correspondence and reports. Prerequisite: ENGL 112 or instructor's permission.

MGMT 265 Business Law I     3 hours
Fundamental principles of law relating to business activity. Extensive use of cases. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

MGMT 311 Public Administration and Policy     3 hours
Examination of growth, structure, role, methods, and policy of the national bureaucracy and its impact in American government and society. Cross-listed as POSC 311. Prerequisite: POSC 111. Offered odd Spring.

MGMT 330 Principles of Management     3 hours
Survey of principles of management. Familiarity with the history and evolution of the field and with modern principles and their application. Prerequisites: MGMT 150; junior standing or instructor's permission.

MGMT 338 International Business     3 hours
Exploration of the challenges involved in multinational and international business. Prerequisites: junior standing, MGMT 330. Offered Fall. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

MGMT 339 Cross-Cultural Management     3 hours
Emphasis on interpersonal skills needed to manage across national borders and show how cultural factors influence behavior in the workplace and the negotiation process. Prerequisite: MGMT 330. Offered Spring.

MGMT 341 Small Business Management     3 hours
The elements necessary to establish and operate a small business are examined in light of internal and environmental requirements. Prerequisite: MGMT 330 or instructor's permission. Offered Fall.

MGMT 360 Organizational Theory     3 hours
Examination of the foundations, theories, models, and literature for designing effective organizations. Extensive library research and case work required. Prerequisite: MGMT 330. Occasional offering.

MGMT 361 Human Resource Management     3 hours
Design, implementation, and administration of human resource management programs. Practices used in developing effective professional habits useful in dealing with executive responsibilities are also examined. Prerequisite: MGMT 330. Offered Spring.

MGMT 362 Organizational Behavior     3 hours
Provides a strong conceptual framework for understanding organizational efficiency as the result of the interactions of people and organizations. Prerequisites: MGMT 330 or PSYC 101. Offered Fall.

MGMT 363 Productions and Operations Management     3 hours
Emphasis on techniques and skill for manufacturing. Quality improvement project required. Prerequisite: MGMT 330. Occasional offering.

MGMT 367 Business Law II     3 hours
Continuation of Business Law I. Prerequisite: MGMT 265. Occasional offering.

MGMT 368 Business Ethics     3 hours
Analysis of principles used to evaluate ethical issues facing today's business community as well as to formulate possible solutions. Prerequisite: MGMT 330. Offered Spring.

MGMT 371 History of American Business     3 hours
Analysis of the enterprise system from the colonial period to the present. The course traces significant
entrepreneurs, innovative firms and political economy affecting the organization of corporate America. Cross-listed as HIST 371. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor¡s permission. Occasional offering.

MGMT 375 Labor Relations     3 hours
Study of management approaches to collective labor agreements. Extensive study of negotiation, grievances and agreement administration. Prerequisite: MGMT 361 or instructor's permission. Occasional offering.

MGMT 393 Business Information Systems     3 hours
Emphasis on management and technical concepts fundamental to business applications and management control of information systems. Coverage will include management information and decision support systems which aid in planning, organizing and controlling business activities. Prerequisites: ACCT 281, CISS 170, MGMT 330 (may be taken concurrently), and junior standing.

MGMT 422 Small-Business Development     3 hours
Continuation of MGMT 341, focusing on the operation and development of an established business concern. Prerequisite: MGMT 341. Occasional offering.

MGMT 430 Management Science     3 hours
Further development of models and quantitative analysis as applied to production management problems. Management research design along with computer applications and quantitative case analyses are stressed. Study of management analysis skills and concepts related to utilization of manpower resources emphasized. Prerequisite: MGMT 363. Occasional offering.

(*) 433 Topics 1-3 hours
Special inquiry into topics not covered in the curriculum. Prerequisite: approval of department head.

MGMT 479 Business Policy     3 hours
Culminating experience for business majors. Requires case/report writing and the ability to integrate and apply material from previous courses to analyze and resolve complex business problems. Prerequisites: Senior standing, completion of most core requirements including at least six hours of upper-level business courses.

(*) 499 Internship in Business     1-3 hours
Application, analysis, and evaluation of managerial functions and practices from the perspective of a management trainee. Supervised, on-site work experience required. Prerequisites: senior standing, cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher, and approval of department chair.

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MARKETING (MKTG)

Business Administration Department

MKTG 310 Principles of Marketing     3 hours
Survey of principles for choosing target markets, assessing their needs, developing products and services, and delivering them at a value to the customer and a profit to the company. Prerequisite: junior standing.

MKTG 327 Retail Management and Strategies     3 hours
Development of policies, methods, and managerial strategies to accommodate the rapidly changing retail environment. Some library research and case analyses are used to examine the challenges confronting the retail establishment. Prerequisites: MGMT 150, junior standing. Offered even Fall.

MKTG 331 Consumer Behavior     3 hours
Introduction to individual and environmental determinants of the behavior of consumers. Use of knowledge of consumers' behavior to plan, implement, and control marketing activities. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Offered Fall.

MKTG 332 Public Relations     3 hours
Policies, strategies, and procedures available to an enterprise in establishing and controlling its communications with its many publics. Prerequisites: MGMT 254 or ENGL 204, and MKTG 310. Offered odd Spring.

MKTG 335 Advertising and Sales Promotion     3 hours
Study of marketing activities that stimulate consumer purchasing and dealer effectiveness. Emphasis on elements and process of developing effective advertising programs; when and how to use refunds, coupons, contests, trade shows, etc. Prerequisite: MKTG 310 or permission of instructor. Offered Fall.

MKTG 352 Personal Selling and Sales Management     3 hours
Emphasis on techniques and skills of personal selling. Sales presentations required. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Offered odd Spring.

MKTG 399 Internship     1-3 hours

MKTG 410 Global Marketing     3 hours
Survey of current international marketing strategy including the historical context of global marketing and current environmental issues and marketing management techniques. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Offered Spring. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirements.

MKTG 441 Marketing Research     3 hours
A managerial approach to this highly technical and quantitative field. Prerequisites: MKTG 310, MATH 250. Offered Spring.

MKTG 478 Marketing Management     3 hours
Examination of the role of the marketing manager in analyzing, planning, implementing, and controlling the marketing programs of an enterprise. Case work is used. Prerequisite: MKTG 310. Offered Spring.

MKTG 499 Internship     1-3 hours

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MATHEMATICS (MATH)

Computer and Mathematical Sciences Department

MATH 104 Beginning Algebra     3 hrs
Introduction to the fundamental concepts of algebra. Review of arithmetic skills, skill development in areas of algebraic expression, equations, inequalities, applied problems, polynomials, and factoring and rational expressions. Students must repeat the course the succeeding semester if a U, F, or D grade is awarded.

MATH 106 Intermediate Algebra     3 hours
Second course in a three-course sequence in algebra. It covers topics needed to bridge the gap between Beginning and College Algebra. Includes review of factoring and rational expressions. Skill development in the area of graphing linear equations and inequalities; solving systems of equations; radicals and rational exponents; quadratic equations; exponential and logarithmic functions. Students must repeat the course the succeeding semester if a U, F, or D grade is awarded. Prerequisite: A passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam or grade of C or better in MATH 104.

MATH 115 Number Systems, Geometry and Statistics     3 hours
Introduction to the structure of number systems and geometry. Topics include sets, logic, informal geometry, numeration systems, properties of real numbers, and elementary probability and statistics. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 104 or a score of 21 or above on the math portion of the ACT (or if the ACT was taken before September 1989, a score of 20 on the "old form"), or a passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam. Offered Spring.

MATH 150 College Algebra     3 hours
Study of algebraic concepts including linear and quadratic equations, inequalities and systems; polynomials, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions in the natural and social sciences with emphasis on their numerical, graphical, and algebraic properties and their applications. Introduction to summation notation, sequences, and series. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in MATH 106 or a score of 21 or above on the math portion of the ACT (or if the ACT was taken before September 1989, a score of 20 on the "old form"), or a passing score on the Columbia College math placement exam. G.E.

MATH 170 Finite Mathematics     3 hours
Introduction to matrices, set theory, linear programming, probability and statistics, including applications. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 106, or a score of 21 or above on the math portion of the ACT (or if the ACT was taken before September 1989, a score of 20 on the Àold form”), or a passing grade on the Columbia College math placement exam. Offered Fall. G.E.

MATH 180 Precalculus     3 hours
Exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, trigonometric functions, law of sines, law of cosines, trigonometric equations and identities. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 150 or a score of 23 or above on the ACT math portion. Offered Spring. G.E.

MATH 200 Calculus for Business and Finance     3 hrs
Introduction to analytic geometry¡s limits, derivatives, definite integrals and their applications. Cross-listed as MGMT 200. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in MATH 150 or MATH 180; junior standing. Occasional offering.

MATH 201 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I     5 hours
The first in a three-part Calculus series. Topics include: Functions and limits, the derivatives and their applications; the integrals and their applications. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 180 or a score of 26 or higher on the math portion of the ACT. Offered Fall. G.E.

MATH 215 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, IA     3 hours
First course of a four-session evening sequence, covering calculus and analytic geometry. Focus on functions, limits, and use of derivatives to solve practical problems. Occasional offering.

MATH 222 Calculus and Analytic Geometry II     5 hours
The second part of the three-part Calculus series. Transcendental functions, techniques of integration, improper integrals, infinite series and power series, parameterized curves, and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: MATH 201 with grade of C or higher. Offered Spring. G.E.

MATH 226 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, IB     3 hours
Second course of a four-session evening sequence. Focus on the use of integrals to solve a variety of practical problems. Topics include derivatives of exponential, hyperbolic, and trigonometric functions; partial derivatives. Occasional offering.

MATH 233 Topics      1-3 hours

MATH 235 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, IIA     3 hours
Third course of a four-session evening sequence. Topics include use of elementary integration, formulations, trigonometric substitutions, Cauchy's and Taylor's formulas, and polar coordinates. Occasional offering.

MATH 245 Calculus and Analytic Geometry, IIB     3 hours
Last course of a four-session evening sequence. Topics include multivariate calculus, infinite series, and differential equations. Occasional offering.

MATH 250 Statistics I     3 hours
Probability theory, random variables, probability distributions, descriptive statistics, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in MATH 150 or MATH 170 or MATH 180; or a score of 23 or above on the ACT math portion. G.E.

MATH 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     1-3 hours

MATH 300 Multivariate Calculus      3 hrs
Two and three dimensional vectors, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 222. Offered Fall.

MATH 301 Introduction to Operations Research     3 hours
Study of linear programming, project scheduling, dynamic programming, integer programming, queuing theory, and stochastic simulation. Prerequisites: MATH 250; MATH 200 or MATH 201. Occasional offering.

MATH 303 Linear Algebra     3 hours
Vector Spaces, linear transformations, matrices and determinants, with applications to systems of linear equations, geometry and other selected topics. Prerequisite: At least six semester hours of mathematics at or above the level of MATH 150. Offered odd Spring.

MATH 304 Introduction to Abstract Algebra     3 hours
Introduction to abstract mathematics. Sets, functions, binary operation, Cartesian products. properties of groups, rings, integral domains, fields and vector spaces are studied. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 303. Offered even Spring.

MATH 306 Discrete Mathematics     3 hours
Study of number systems, sets and logic, combinatories, relations and functions, mathematical induction, logic and graph theory. Most applications are oriented toward computer science. Prerequisites: At least 6 semester hours at or above MATH 150, and CISS 240. Offered even Fall.

MATH 331 Foundations of Geometry     3 hours
Axiomatic development of Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometries. Transformations of the Euclidean plane, constructions. Introduction to Hyperbolic geometry. Poincarءs model of the hyperbolic plane. Prerequisite: MATH 222 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Spring.

MATH 340 Introduction to Probability Theory     3 hrs
Probability spaces; random variables and their distributions; repeated trials; probability limit theorem. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in MATH 300. Offered even Fall

MATH 370 Differential Equations     3 hours
Ordinary differential equations and systems with application to the sciences and engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 360. Offered Spring.

MATH 380 Advanced Calculus      3 hrs
Rigorous development of some central ideas in analysis including limits, continuity and differentiability. Prerequisite: MATH 222 with grade of C or better. Offered odd Fall

MATH 433 Topics 1-3 hours

MATH 494 Senior Seminar in Mathematics     1 hr
A seminar course required as a culminating experience for mathematics majors. Students prepare and present short mathematical talks on topics not covered in core courses in consultation with the instructor. Grade of C or higher required. Prerequisites: Senior standing and faculty advisor approval.

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MILITARY SCIENCE (MSCI)

Offered through the University of Missouri-Columbia. The course-numbering system is the same as that used by the university.

MSCI 10 Introduction to Military Science     1 hour
Introductory military science class. Topics include physical fitness, communications theory, rapelling, officership, Army organization, and ethics. MSCI 11 Lab optional but highly encouraraged. Offered Fall.

MSCI 11 Introduction to Military Science Laboratory    1 hour
Field application of skills taught in MSCI 10 to include leadership, land navigation, tactical skills and basic soldier skills. Offered Fall.

MSCI 12 Leadership and the Problem Solving Process    1 hour
Leadership principles and problem solving process. Topics include critical thinking skills, power and influence and rifle marksmanship. MSCI 13 Lab optional but highly encouraged. Offered Spring.

MSCI 13 Introductory Military Science Laboratory II     1 hour
Field application of skills taught in MSCI 12 to include leadership, land navigation, tactical skills and basic soldier skills. Offered Spring.

MSCI 20 Intermediate Military Science I      2 hrs
Study of military leadership, practical application of critical reasoning and individual judgment with emphasis on developing leaders. Application of physical fitness plan, land navigation and confidence skills. Introduction to military orders. Written and oral presentations required. Offered Fall.

MSCI 21 Intermediate Military Science Laboratory     1 hr
Progressively more challenging leadership scenarios presented in a field and classroom environment. Students practice basic military skills such as squad level offensive and defensive operations. First aid topics and drill and ceremony are also taught. Offered Fall.

MSCI 22 Intermediate Military Science II     2 hrs
Introduction to values and ethics with emphasis on developing leaders. Students learn officer duties including counseling and mentoring techniques. Practical application of confidence skills and marksmanship. Further study of military orders. Written and oral presentations required. Offered Spring.

MSCI 23 Intermediate Military Science Laboratory     1 hr
Progressively more challenging leadership scenarios presented in a field and classroom environment. Students practice basic military skills such as platoon level offensive and defensive operations. Practical application of night land navigation. Offered Spring.

MSCI 230 Advanced Techniques of Military Science and Leadership     3 hrs
Specific instruction in the principles of war, decision making processes, planning models, and risk assessment. Advanced leadership instruction focused on the role and actions of leaders. Leadership Lab required. Prerequisites: Junior standing and consent of instructor. Offered Fall.

MSCI 231 Command Operations      3 hrs
Specific instruction is given in individual leader development; planning, and execution of small unit operations; and individual and team development. Leadership Lab required. Prerequisite: MSCI 230. Offered Spring.

MSCI 250 Leadership, Management, and Ethics     3 hrs
Develops the skills to coordinate activities with military staffs; counseling theory and application; training and administrative/logistical management; and ethics. Leadership Lab required. Prerequisite: MSCI 231. Offered Fall.

MSCI 251 Transition to Lieutenant     3 hrs
Instructional application of military law; organization for military operations; administrative/logistical management; service as an officer; and capstone exercise. Leadership Lab required. Offered Spring.

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MUSIC (MUSI)

Humanities Department

MUSI 102 Music Fundamentals     3 hours
Study of basic notation and other techniques leading to the understanding of the fundamentals of music. Prerequisite: Ability to read music. Offered Spring.

MUSI 122 Music Appreciation     3 hours
A study of the musical styles and lives of the world's greatest composers. No knowledge of music is required and students are not expected to perform in front of the class. G.E.

MUSI 160, 360 Jane Froman Singers     3 hours
Select group requiring travel and performance; by audition.

MUSI 233 Topics 1-3 hours

MUSI 322 Masterpieces of Music     3 hours
In-depth study of the lives and musical styles of great composers. No knowledge of music is required and students are not expected to perform in front of the class. Offered Fall. G.E.

MUSI 323 Music of the United States     3 hours
Overview of the music that has evolved through the folk, popular, and classical traditions in America from the pilgrims to the present. No knowledge of music is required and students are not expected to perform in front of the class. Offered Spring.

MUSI 325 Music and Art in the Western World     3 hours
Appreciation of the visual and musical arts through the study of great painting, sculpture, music, and architecture. Occasional offering. G.E.

MUSI 433 Topics     1-3 hours

Applied Music
Instrumental study must be taken in sequence with the same instrument.

MUSI 171, 172, 273, 274 Piano      1 hour

MUSI 181, 182, 283, 284 Voice      1 hour

MUSI 183 Broadway Music Voice Class     1 hour
Class instruction in voice using appropriate music from the American Broadway Musical Theater. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Occasional offering.

MUSI 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     1-3 hours

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NAVAL SCIENCE (NAVL)

Offered through the University of Missouri-Columbia. The course-numbering system is the same as that used by the University.

NAVL 11 Introduction to Naval Science     2 hours
This course serves as an introduction to Midshipmen to the organization of the Naval Service, the varied career opportunities available, the long held customs and traditions of the service, and the duties of a Junior Officer.

NAVL 123 Seapower and Maritime Affairs     3 hours
Seminars examine the application of seapower as an instrument of foreign policy by the major nations of the world. Emphasis placed on role of the Navy. Offered Spring.

NAVL 124 Naval Ships Systems I     3 hours
Ship construction, stability and damage control, basic thermodynamics, the steam cycle and engineering plant, including introduction to gas turbine, diesel and nuclear powered systems. Offered Spring.

NAVL 125 Naval Ships Systems II     3 hours
Naval weapons systems, their employment and control, including the basic fire control problem, with emphasis on new systems. Offered Fall.

NAVL 155 Evolution of Warfare     3 hours
Evolution of strategy, tactics, weapons and leadership from earliest beginning through the Vietnam period. Development of military policy, the impact of warfare on the political, social and economic structure of nations. Offered even Fall.

NAVL 156 Amphibious Warfare     3 hours
History and development of amphibious warfare, principles of amphibious warfare techniques; their application in selected examples from modern history. Offered odd Fall.

NAVL 235 Navigation     3 hours
Theoretical and practical application of marine navigation. Includes fundamentals of dead reckoning, piloting, tides and current, celestial navigation, electronic navigation. Offered Fall.

NAVL 236 Naval Operations     3 hours
Principles and concepts of naval operations: rules of the road, command and control in naval operations, communications, ASW warfare, international maritime law, and practical solution of relative motion problems. Prerequisite: NAVL 235. Offered Spring.

NAVL 248 Administration in the Naval Profession     2 hours
Administrative aspects of naval leadership including selected current topics in personnel management, material management, organization and military law. Offered Spring.

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NURSING (NURS)

Evening and Graduate Division

NURS 201 Introduction to Associate Degree Nursing     3 hours
This course is designed to provide the foundation for the transition from the role of Licensed Practical Nurse to the role of the Registered Professional Nurse prepared at the Associate Degree level. Communication theory, legal-ethical issues, sociocultural concepts and patient education principles are introduced. Emphasis is placed on the nursing process, using Orem¡s Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing, assessment skills and basic principles of IV therapy. Prerequisite: Acceptance into Level II courses.

NURS 210 Maternal-Child Nursing      6 hours
This course is designed to provide the foundation for entry level competence in maternal-child nursing utilizing the nursing process within the framework of the Self-Care Deficit Theory. Emphasis is placed on developing systems of care for the woman with an uncomplicated and complicated pregnancy, the normal and high risk newborn, and children and adolescents with health deviations. Various developmental theories are presented to assist the student in analyzing growth and development from birth through adolescence. Communication, legal-ethical, patient education, pharmacological, nutritional and sociolcultural principles are integrated throughout. Prerequisites: NURS 201, 220, 240, 250.

NURS 220 Mental Health Nursing      6 hours
This course is designed to provide the foundation for entry level competence in Mental Health Nursing. Interpersonal, behavioral, and biopsychosocial concepts as well as the Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing will provide the basis for designing systems of care. Emphasis is placed on selected pathophysiological concepts and related care using the nursing process within the framework of the Self-Care Deficit Theory. Therapeutic communication skills within the nurse-patient relationship, as well as the professional nurse¡s role, will be emphasized in the treatment of patients with psychosocial and substance dependence health deviations. Legal-ethical, patient education, pharmacological, nutritional and sociocultural principles are integrated throughout the course. Prerequisites: NURS 201, 240, 250.

NURS 240 Advanced Medical-Surgical Nursing I      6 hours
This course is designed to provide the foundation for entry level competence in adult Medical-Surgical Nursing. Emphasis is placed on selected pathophysiological concepts and the related care using Self-Care Deficit Theory and the nursing process. Communica-tion, legal-ethical, patient education, pharmacological, nutritional and sociocultural principles are integrated throughout. Leadership and management theories are presented. Prerequisite: NURS 201.

NURS 250 Advanced Medical-Surgical Nursing II      6 hours
This course is designed to introduce students to speciality areas and technology associated with the care of critically ill adult medical-surgical patients. Emphasis is placed on developing skills needed to plan, manage, and provide patient care to critically ill patients using the nursing process within the framework of the Self-Care Deficit Theory of Nursing. Communication, legal-ethical, patient education, pharmacological, nutritional, and sociocultural principles are integrated throughout. Prerequisites: NURS 201, 240.

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PHILOSOPHY (PHIL)

History and Social Sciences Department

PHIL 201 Introduction to Western Philosophy     3 hours
Exploration of problems and methods of philosophical inquiry including such topics as belief systems, values and meaning; theories of nature, God, and humankind; the nature of knowledge and its acquisition. Offered Fall. G.E.

PHIL 202 Introduction to Eastern Philosophies and Religions     3 hours
Examination of philosophy, religion, and belief systems of Eastern cultures, past and present. Student will study the various traditional "systems of thought" as well as practice non-Western forms of thinking: three-value logic, circular logic, Yoga philosophy, Zen Koan philosophy, etc. Cross-listed as RELI 202. Offered Spring. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

PHIL 210 Logic     3 hours
Introduction to the principles and methods of logic. Deduction, induction, and fallacies are emphasized. Occasional offering. G.E.

PHIL 233 Topics     1-3 hours

PHIL 303 History and Philosophy of Modern Science     3 hours
Evolution of scientific thought from 1600 A.D. to the present. Cross-listed as HIST 303. Prerequisite: HIST 102. Offered odd Spring.

PHIL 330 Ethics     3 hours
Examination of various moral philosophers' attempts to prescribe ethical norms applicable to all humanity. Prerequisite: junior standing.

PHIL 340 Philosophy of Revolution     3 hours
Examination of the nature of revolution  intellectual, economic, and political. Cross-listed as HIST 340. Offered Spring.

PHIL 350 Philosophy of Religion     3 hours
Inquiry into origin, nature, function of religion with an examination of the source and validity of claims religion makes. Cross-listed as RELI 350. Prerequisite: PHIL 201 or RELI 101 or instructor's permission. Offered Spring.

PHIL 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study 1-3 hours

PHIL 400 Political Philosophy     3 hours
Study of major writers in political philosophy including Plato, Aristotle, Acquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx and others. Cross-listed as POSC 400. Offered even Fall. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PHED)

Education Department

PHED 100 Aerobics I      .5 hour
1st eight weeks. An activity class designed to improve overall health and fitness through aerobic activity.

PHED 101 Aerobics II      .5 hour
2nd eight weeks. An activity class designed to improve overall health and fitness through aerobic activity.

PHED 103 Varsity Volleyball     1 hour

PHED 104 Varsity Basketball     1 hour

PHED 106 Varsity Softball     1 hour

PHED 107 Varsity Soccer     1 hour

Note: PHED 103, 104, 105, 106, and 107 require participation and completion of all requirements for varsity sports as determined by the Athletic Department.

PHED 108 Beginning Weight Training and Conditioning I      .5 hour
1st eight weeks. An activity class designed to improve total fitness through weight training and aerobic activity.

PHED 109 Beginning Weight Training and Conditioning II     .5 hour
2nd eight weeks. An activity class designed to improve total fitness through weight training and aerobic activity.

PHED 111 Beginning Tennis      .5 hour
An activity class designed for the individual who wants to learn a lifetime activity.

PHED 112 Indoor Racquet Sports     .5 hour
A lifetime activity class (Badminton).

PHED 113 Recreational Volleyball     .5 hour
An activity class designed to teach the basics of recreational volleyball.

PHED 114 Advanced Lifesaving     .5 hour
A Red Cross certified course for people interested in lifeguarding. Occasional offering.

PHED 115 Outdoor Recreation     .5 hour
An activity class focusing on outdoor lifetime activities.

PHED 140 First Aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR)     2 hours
American Red Cross certification: basic first aid and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) procedures. Offered Fall.

PHED 150 Basic Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries     2 hours
Introduction to fundamentals of care and prevention of athletic injuries and athletic training. Offered Fall.

PHED 350 Advanced Care, Prevention, and Rehabilitation of Athletic Injuries and Illnesses     3 hours
In-depth study of athletic-training techniques and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses. Prerequisite: PHED 150. Offered Spring.

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PHYSICS (PHYS)

Science Department

PHYS 108 Physical Science Survey     3 hours
Examination of the physical world and its underlying scientific principles. Cross-listed as CHEM 108. Prerequisite: MATH 106. G.E.

PHYS 108L Physical Science Survey Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experience to complement PHYS 108. Cross-listed as CHEM 108L. Prerequisite: MATH 106. Offered Spring. G.E.

PHYS 111 College Physics I     3 hours
First of a two-part algebra-based college physics sequence. Topics include classical mechanics å linear, circular, and rotational motion; statics; elasticity; vibrations and waves; sound; heat and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: MATH 150 or MATH 170 or MATH 180. Offered Fall. G.E.

PHYS 111L Physics I Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement PHYS 111. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: MATH 150 or MATH 170 or MATH 180; PHYS 111 (may be taken concurrently). Offered Fall. G.E.

PHYS 112 College Physics II     3 hours
Second of a two-part algebra-based college physics sequence. Topics include electricity, magnetism, optics, modern physics, and astrophysics (optional). Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Offered Spring.

PHYS 112L Physics II Laboratory     2 hours
Laboratory experiences to complement PHYS 112. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: PHYS 111. Offered Spring.

PHYS 211 Calculus-Based Physics I     5 hours
First part of a two-part calculus-based college physics sequence. Examines classical mechanics å linear, rotational, and circular motion; statics; elasticity; vibrations and waves; sound; heat and thermodynamics. Lab experiences based on the above topics are included. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: MATH 201. Occasional offering.

PHYS 212 Calculus-Based Physics II     5 hours
Second part of a two-part calculus-based college physics sequence. Examines the following concepts and their applications: electricity, magnetism, optics, modern physics, and astrophysics (optional). Laboratory experiences based on the above topics are included. $20 lab fee. Prerequisite: PHYS 211. Occasional offering.

PHYS 233 Topics     1-3 hours

PHYS 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study      1-3 hours

PHYS 401 Introduction to Physical Chemistry/Chemical Physics     3 hours
Introduction to quantum mechanics, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy. Topics include kinetic theory of gases, gas laws, and thermodynamics. Cross-listed as CHEM 401. Prerequisites: PHYS 111 and 111L; PHYS 112 and 112L or PHYS 211 or 212; MATH 201; CHEM 303 and 303L; or instructor¡s permission. Offered even Spring.

PHYS 433 Topics 1-3 hours

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Political Science (POSC)

History and Social Sciences Department

POSC 111 American National Government     3 hours
Survey of the American political system, with emphasis on the Constitution, governmental structure, the political process and citizen involvement in that process. G.E.

POSC 215 State and Local Government     3 hrs
A comparative study of American state and local governments with emphasis on federalism, national and state relations, interstate regulations, and structure and process of state and local governments. Offered odd Spring.

POSC 233, 333, 433 Topics 1-3 hours

POSC 233 Topics: Mock Trial     2 hours
Available to members of the Columbia College Mock Trial Team. Requires participation beginning in the Fall when the team begins preparing the case through the end of the mock trial season. Cross-listed as CJAD 233. Course may be repeated two times. Offered Spring.

POSC 292 International Relations     3 hours
Study of major concepts and approaches in world politics and analysis of process, institutions, problems of war and peace, and contemporary trends. Offered odd Spring. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

POSC 311 Public Administration and Policy     3 hours
Survey of principles, functions, and processes of governmental administration. Also addresses human relations issues associated with administration as well as organization structures, personnel, budgeting, and bureaucratic values. Cross-listed as MGMT 311. Prerequisite: POSC 111. Offered odd Spring.

POSC 312 Environmental Politics     3 hrs
Study of environmental issues and policies from both a national and global perspective. Cross-listed as ENVS 312. Prerequisite: POSC 111. Offered odd Fall.

POSC 313 Political Geography     3 hours
Spatial aspects of power, decision-making, and authority including the political organization of territory, regionalism, and supranationalism. Cross-listed as GEOG 313. Prerequisites: POSC 111 or 215; GEOG 101; or instructor¡s permission. Offered even Spring.

POSC 317 Politics of Russia and Eurasia     3 hrs
Study of the government and politics of Russia and other countries of the former Soviet Union. The course will examine the historical legacy of communism and analyze the process of political and economic transition since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Offered odd Spring.

POSC 321 Politics of Developing Nations     3 hours
Analysis of the governmental structures and roles played by developing nations in contemporary world affairs. Occasional offering.

POSC 326 International Law and Organizations     3 hrs
Study of the evolution of international law and organizations and their role in global politics in areas such as human rights, environmental protection, collective security and global trade. Prerequisite: POSC 292 or instructor¡s permission. Offered odd Spring.

POSC 331 European Politics      3 hrs
Analysis of the government and politics of the major European powers, including Britain, France and Germany, as well as the European Union. Offered even Spring.

POSC 332 The American Presidency     3 hours
Study of the presidency from an historical perspective. Examines formal and informal patterns of executive power and the interaction of the executive with the legislative and judicial branches of government as well as with American states and other nations. Prerequisite: POSC 111. Offered even Spring.

POSC 333 Topics: Mock Trial     2 hours
Available to members of the Columbia College Mock Trial Team. Requires participation beginning in the Fall when the team begins preparing the case through the end of the mock trial season. Cross-listed as CJAD 333. Course may be repeated two times. Offered Spring.

POSC 340 Judicial Process     3 hours
Study of the state and federal court systems and the impact which those systems have on American politics and society. Prerequisite: POSC 111. Offered Spring.

POSC 350 Legislative Process     3 hours
Study of Congress, its structure, procedures, role, and impact in American politics. Prerequisite: POSC 111. Offered odd Fall.

POSC 353 Asian Politics     3 hrs
Analysis of the government and politics of selected Asian countries and their economic and social systems. Offered even Fall.

POSC 360 U.S. Foreign Policy     3 hrs
Examination of the historical context of U.S. foreign policy, the institutions and processes of foreign policy-making and contemporary foreign policy issues and challenges. Prerequisite: POSC 292 or permission of the instructor. Offered even Spring.

POSC 361 American Political Parties     3 hours
Study of the American political process with an emphasis on the role, organization, function and processes of political parties and pressure groups. Prerequisite: POSC 111. Offered even Fall.

POSC 390 Political Science Research Methods     3 hours
An introduction to the research process used in political science. The scope of political science research and the methods used to address political questions are studied. Prerequisite: three previous courses in political science or government. Offered Fall.

POSC 399 Internship      1-12 hours
Involves working as an intern in a governmental office. Students must work 45 clock hours during the semester for one hour of academic credit. Evaluation is Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Prerequisites: POSC 111; instructor's permission at least one semester prior to internship.

POSC 400 Political Philosophy     3 hours
Study of major writers in political philosophy including Plato, Aristotle, Acquinas, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and others. Cross-listed as PHIL 400. Offered even Fall. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

POSC 440 Constitutional Law     3 hours
Study of the basic principles of the American Constitutional framework and its development through Supreme Court interpretation. Issues of governmental power and civil liberties are covered. Prerequisite: POSC 111. Offered odd Fall.

POSC 490 Independent Study in Political Science     3 hours
Culminating experience for graduation with a B.A. in Political Science.
Requires original research project and final paper. Grade of C or higher required. Prerequisite: POSC 390. Offered Spring.

POSC 255, 256, 257, 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     1-3 hours

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PSYCHOLOGY (PSYC)

History and Social Sciences Department

PSYC 101 General Psychology     3 hours
Introduction to the field of psychology and the major sub-areas including the biological basis of behavior, sensation, perception, learning, memory, motivation, emotion, personality, stress, as well as abnormal, developmental and social psychology. Students majoring in Psychology must earn a grade of C or better. G.E.

PSYC 230 Educational Psychology     3 hours
Applications of psychological principles in educational environments. Emphasis on the scientific approach to teaching and learning. Students learn to plan, deliver, evaluate, and report instructional outcomes. Cross-listed as EDUC 230. Prerequisite: PSYC 101.

PSYC 233 Topics     1-3 hours

PSYC 260 Introduction to Applied Psychology     3 hours
An introduction to Applied Psychology, including uses of psychology in personal adjustment across the lifespan, in education, interpersonal relationships, marriage, family and parenting, work, physical and psychological health, and in identifying and treating psychopathology. A service learning component may be used as a means of providing students with practical experience with applied psychology. Students will be exposed to major theoretical perspectives in applied psychology and methods and findings based in scientific psychology. Offered Spring.

PSYC 304 Personality Theory     3 hours
Examination of the major personality theories, including those proposed by Freud and his followers, learning theorists, trait theorists, social-learning theorists, and humanists. Current research into personality, using modern methods, also reviewed. $20 lab fee. Prerequisites: 6 hrs. of PSYC courses and junior standing. Offered odd Fall.

PSYC 310 Crisis Intervention     3 hours
Survey of the current crisis intervention literature and introduction to the theories, principles, concepts and techniques of crisis intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to predict who may need crisis intervention services, and demonstrate the provision of first-order crisis intervention. Cross-listed as CJAD 310. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Offered Spring.

PSYC 320 Tests and Measurements     3 hours
Study of informal and standardized test development, administration, and evaluation from both the normative and criterion-referenced points-of-view. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 324. Offered odd Spring.

PSYC 324 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences     3 hours
The study of parametric and nonparametric statistics commonly used in the behavioral sciences. Included is analyses of relationship and variance, as well as effect sizes associated with each. Cross-listed as SOCI 324. Students majoring in Psychology must earn a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: MATH 150.

PSYC 325 Research Design     3 hours
Study of applied research in the behavioral sciences, with emphases on design, methodology, results interpretation, and theory building. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches to research are addressed with the latter employing both parametric and nonparametric analyses. Cross listed as SOCI 325. Students majoring in Psychology must earn a grade of C or better. Prerequisites: Grade of C of higher in PSYC/SOCI 324; junior standing. Offered Fall.

PSYC 326 Experimental Psychology     3 hours
Provides students with hands-on research experience and knowledge of experimental procedures through participation in representative experiments. Prerequisite: 6 hours of psychology courses. Offered odd Fall.

PSYC 330 Lifespan Developmental Psychology     3 hours
Physiological, environmental, and interactive variables influencing human development from conception to death. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOWK 101. Offered Fall.

PSYC 336 Industrial/Organizational Psychology     3 hours
Examination of humans and work. Investigates both theoretical models and application of principles in relation to personnel, psychology, organizational psychology, and the work environment. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Occasional offering.

PSYC 341 Social/Psychological Aspects of Religion     3 hours
Social and psychological principles and concepts applied to religions and religious movements. Cross-listed as SOCI 341. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOCI 111. Occasional offering.

PSYC 360 Social Psychology     3 hours
Theories, methods, and research on the nature and causes of individual behavior in social situations. Cross-listed as SOCI 360. Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of PSYC and/or SOCI courses. Offered Spring.

PSYC 371 Physiological Psychology     3 hours
Comprehensive survey of the physiological processes and structures underlying human and animal behavior including sensation, movement, emotion, learning, memory, sleep, drugs and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of psychology courses. Offered even Spring.

PSYC 381 History and Systems of Psychology     3 hours
Overview of historical antecedents and major theoretical and historical systems within psychology. Students majoring in Psychology must earn a grade of C or better. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 and sophomore standing. Offered Spring.

PSYC 385 Human Sexuality     3 hours
Exploration of sexuality from biological, psychological, and social perspectives. Critical issues directly and indirectly associated with sexual behavior are addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Offered Fall.

PSYC 391 Child Psychology     3 hours
Study of the maturational and environmental factors that shape the physical, behavioral, and social development of the child from conception to puberty. Cross-listed as EDUC 391. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Offered Spring.

PSYC 392 Adolescent Psychology     3 hours
Study of the processes that influence physical, social, and behavioral development beginning with the transescent stage to adulthood. Cross-listed as EDUC 392. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Offered Fall.

PSYC 395 Adult Psychology     3 hours
Physiological, behavioral, and cognitive changes that occur in adulthood and old age, discussed from a psychological/developmental perspective. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. Occasional offering.

PSYC 412 Learning and Cognition     3 hours
Theoretical and empirical research related to learning, memory, attention, problem solving, concept formation, and language. Prerequisites: 6 hrs. of psychology courses. Offered even Spring.

PSYC 433 Topics     1-3 hours

PSYC 450 Abnormal Psychology     3 hours
Major categories of behavior disorders are considered in terms of theory, etiology, symptoms and treatment. Fundamental questions related to diagnosis, definitions of disorders and reaction of society are discussed. Prerequisites: 6 hrs. of psychology courses; junior standing. Offered even Fall.

PSYC 460 Introduction to Clinical and Counseling Psychology     3 hours
Contemporary theory and practices in clinical and counseling psychology. First-, second-, and third-order interventions are studied from the psychoanalytic, behavioral, phenomenological, and social-learning theory perspectives. Research, legal, and ethical issues are examined as they relate to paraprofessional and professional practice. Prerequisites: 6 hrs. of psychology courses; junior standing. Offered odd Spring.

PSYC 480 Group Process     3 hours
Psychotherapeutic techniques used in small and large-group interventions, including reviews of the current research, legal, and ethical issues associated with paraprofessional and professional practice. Prerequisites: PSYC 101 and PSYC 460. Occasional offering.

PSYC 485 Interaction Seminar     3 hours
Provides the opportunity for students to strengthen interpersonal helping skills. Includes individual and group activities. Prerequisites: PSYC 460; senior standing, and instructor's permission. Occasional offering.

PSYC 495 Integrative Psychology     3 hours
Capstone course integrating prior learning, exploring current research and contemporary issues in psychology. Writing intensive. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the Major Field Test for Psychology. Required as a culminating experience prior to graduation. Grade of C or better is required for this course and all prerequisite courses. Prerequisites: Senior standing, Psychology major; PSYC 101, PSYC 324, PSYC 325, PSYC 381.

PSYC 499 Internship     1-3 hours
An opportunity for students to practice acquired skills under close supervision in a professional environment. Prerequisites: cumulative GPA 3.0 or higher, senior standing, and full-time instructor's permission (to be obtained at least one semester prior to placement). One hour credit awarded for each 45 clock hours.

PSYC 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     3 hours
Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

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RELIGIOUS STUDIES (RELI)

History and Social Sciences Department

RELI 101 Religion and Human Experience     3 hours
Provides an objective setting to encourage students to examine religion and various religious traditions in the world, with opportunities to understand religion in the context of their own experiences. Offered Fall. G.E.

RELI 201 Comparative Religion     3 hours
Basic teachings and historical development of the major world religions of today. Prerequisite: RELI 101 or sophomore standing. Occasional offering. G.E.

RELI 202 Introduction to Eastern Philosophies and Religions     3 hours
Examination of philosophy, religion, and belief systems of Eastern cultures, past and present. Student will study the various traditional "systems of thought" as well as practice non-Western forms of thinking: three-value logic, circular logic, Yoga philosophy, Zen Koan philosophy, etc. Cross-listed as PHIL 202. Offered Spring. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

RELI 350 Philosophy of Religion     3 hours
Inquiry into origin, nature, function of religion with an examination of the source and validity of claims religion makes. Cross-listed as PHIL 350. Prerequisite: PHIL 201 or RELI 101 or instructor's permission. Offered Spring.

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SOCIAL WORK (SOWK)

Criminal Justice Adminstration and Social Work Department

SOWK 101 Introduction to Social Work     3 hours
History of social welfare and examination of social work in a variety of practice areas.

SOWK 233, 333, 433 Topics 3 hours

SOWK 290 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I     3 hours
The first of two courses, this course assumes a lifespan perspective and focuses on prenatal development through infancy, childhood and adolescence. There is an emphasis on theories and knowledge of human bio-psycho-social development, including theories and knowledge about the range of social systems in which development takes place (families, groups, organizations, institutions and communities). The impacts of various social and economic forces are examined as they affect human behavior and act to promote or deter optimal health and well-being. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOWK 101. Offered Spring.

SOWK 300 Generalist Social Work Practice     3 hours
An overview of generalist social work practice including the knowledge, values and skills as applied to client systems of all sizes. Particular emphasis is on the values and ethics of the profession as well as the theoretical perspectives of the program. Students will be expected to enroll in this course as a part of their application to the Social Work Program. Prerequisite: SOWK 101 or consent of the department.

SOWK 320 Social Work with Individuals     3 hours
Provides skills needed to work with individuals within the framework or generalist practice utilitizing the ecological systems, conflict and strengths perspectives, with an emphasis on collaborative partnership for planned change. Prerequisites: SOWK 290, SOWK 300, and submission of application materials for acceptance into the Social Work Program. Offered Spring.

SOWK 345 Social Work Research     3 hours
Focuses on the relationship between generalist social work practice and research including how research can help promote social and economic justice. In this practice-oriented course students will become familiar with the application of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies for building knowledge as well as how to become effective consumers of research findings. Students will learn methods of implementation and evaluation of research with systems of all sizes including single-subject design and program evaluation. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Social Work Program; MATH 250 or PSYC 324 (PSYC 325 is also recommended for students who take PSYC 324 and who plan to attend graduate school in Social Work). Offered Fall.

SOWK 360 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II     3 hours
Provides the student with an understanding of the normal processes of sequential physical, emotional and socio-cultural development from young adulthood through old age. Systems theory, ecological and strengths perspectives are emphasized as a means to understanding the interactive context of individuals and social systems (families, groups, organizations and communities) as they exist within a social environment and are impacted by a variety of social forces (political, economic, environmental and ideological). Prerequisite: SOWK 290. Offered Fall.

SOWK 365 American Social Policy     3 hours
Nature and development of American social policy, including analyses of current social policy issues. Prerequisite: SOCI 111 or SOWK 101. Cross-listed as SOCI 365. Offered Spring.

SOWK 370 Minority Cultures and Relations     3 hours
Survey of racial, ethnic and other minority/ majority relations in America. Cross-listed as SOCI 370. Offered Spring. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

SOWK 390 Generalist Social Work Practice II     3 hours
Social work generalist-practice values, knowledge, and skills applied to families and groups. Prerequisites: SOWK 290, SOWK 320 and acceptance into the Social Work Program. SOWK 320 may be taken as a corequisite. Offered Spring.

SOWK 425 Generalist Social Work Practice III     3 hours
Values, knowledge and skills of generalist social work practice in the contexts of communities and organizations. Prerequisites: SOWK 320, SOWK 290 and acceptance into the Social Work Program. SOWK 360 must be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite. Offered Fall.

SOWK 490 Senior Practicum and Integrative Seminar I     6 hours
This course and SOWK 495 constitute the culminating experience for the Social Work major.
Student will complete 240 hours of supervised field experience targeted to behaviorally implementing the objectives of the Social Work Program in a human service agency. Students also meet weekly as a group, to explore professional and developmental issues related to performance in the field. Students are expected to complete a literature review and an ecomap analyzing the field placement agency and their role as a student within the agency. Prerequisites: All core SOWK requirements, senior standing, BSW candidate, and instructor¡s permission. Corequisite: SOWK 495 in the same semester.

SOWK 495 Senior Practicum and Integrative Field Seminar II     6 hours
This course and SOWK 490 constitutes the culminating experience for the Social Work major.
Taken concurrently with SOWK 490, students will complete an additional 240 hours of supervised field experience targeted to behaviorally implementing the objectives of the Social Work Program in a human service agency. A weekly seminar examines professional and developmental issues related to field experience and assists students in integrating the knowledge, values and skills of generalist social work practice. At the completion of this course, students are expected to write a comprehensive paper demonstrating ability to comprehend and apply Social Work Program objectives to knowledge and experience gained throughout the student¡s educational experience. (Practicum experiences are most commonly arranged for agency daytime hours.) Prerequisites: All core SOWK requirements with the exception of SOWK 490; senior standing, BSW candidate, and instructor¡s permission. Corequisite: SOWK 490 in the same semester.

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SOCIOLOGY (SOCI)

History and Social Sciences Department

SOCI 111 General Sociology     3 hours
Introduction to the study of small and large scale human social interaction and social organizations. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

SOCI 112 General Anthropology     3 hour
Introduction to the study of human physical and cultural evolution. Offered Spring. G.E. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

SOCI 214 Family     3 hours
Survey of structures, functions, processes, and alternative life styles and problems in the contemporary family. Offered Fall. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

SOCI 216 American Social Problems     3 hours
Nature and impact of contemporary social problems. Offered Spring.

SOCI 280 Social Biology     3 hours
Relationship between social behavior and biology. Cross-listed as BIOL 280. Prerequisite: BIOL 110 or sophomore standing. Occasional offering.

SOCI 310 Women and Society     3 hrs
Analysis of the social and cultural forces that shape women's position in society; explanations and critical analysis of the gendered nature of our reality. Occasional offering.

SOCI 312 Organizations and Institutions     3 hours
Patterns of social organization in modern societies; organizational structures and processes; interrelation of social institutions; problems of an organizational society and its consequences for individual life experiences. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Occasional offering.

SOCI 321 Criminology     3 hours
Theories concerning the nature, cause, control, treatment, and prevention of crime. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered Fall.

SOCI 324 Statistics for the Behavioral Sciences     3 hours
The study of parametric and nonparametric statistics commonly used in the behavioral sciences. Included is analyses of relationship and variance, as well as effect sizes associated with each. Cross-listed as PSYC 324. Prerequisite: MATH 150.

SOCI 325 Research Design     3 hours
The study of applied research in the behavioral sciences, with emphases on design, methodology, results interpretation and theory building. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are addressed with the latter employing both parametric and nonparametric analyses. Cross-listed as PSYC 325. Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in PSYC/SOCI 324; jurnior standing.

SOCI 331 Juvenile Delinquency     3 hours
Nature and extent, competing models and theories, prevention, control, treatment, and research in juvenile delinquency. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered Spring.

SOCI 333, 433 Topics     1-3 hrs

SOCI 341 Social/Psychological Aspects of Religion     3 hours
Social and psychological principles and concepts applied to religions and religious movements. Cross-listed as PSYC 341. Prerequisite: PSYC 101 or SOCI 111. Occasional offering.

SOCI 350 Social Gerontology     3 hours
Social, psychological, and demographic aspects of aging and dying and the role of the elderly in society. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Occasional offering.

SOCI 355, 356, 357, 455, 456, 457 Directed Study     1-3 hrs
Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

SOCI 360 Social Psychology     3 hours
Theories, methods, and research on the nature and causes of individual behavior in social situations. Cross-listed as PSYC 360. Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of PSYC and/or SOCI courses. Offered Spring.

SOCI 365 American Social Policy     3 hours
Nature and development of American social policy including analyses of current social-policy issues. Cross-listed as SOWK 365. Prerequisite: SOCI 111 or SOWK 101. Offered Spring.

SOCI 370 Minority Cultures and Relations     3 hours
Survey of historical and contemporary minority/ majority relations among various racial, ethnic and gender groups. Cross-listed as SOWK 370. Offered Spring. Course meets World/Eastern Culture graduation requirement.

SOCI 380 Theories of Society     3 hours
The development of sociological theories in Europe and the U.S.; major theoretical perspectives in sociology. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered Fall.

SOCI 401 The American Community     3 hours
Nature, history, structure and functions of, and changes in American communities. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Occasional offering.

SOCI 412 Population and Ecology     3 hours
Study of population composition and dynamics by age, sex, and ethnicity; fertility, mortality and migration; patterns of population growth and distribution in the United States and the world. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Occasional offering.

SOCI 421 Class, Status, and Power     3 hours
Social stratification and inequality in society. Prerequisite: SOCI 111. Offered Fall.

SOCI 430 The Sociology of Sport     3 hrs
Survey of social and projected role of the patterns of sports and heroism in society. Occasional offering.

SOCI 495 Integrative Seminar     1 hour
A capstone course to apply prior learning to probing major areas of research in sociology. Culminating experience for the major. Prerequisites: Senior standing; Sociology Major; SOCI 111, 324, 325, and 380.

SOCI 499 Internship     1-3 hours
Involves the application of the student¡s sociological knowledge and skills in an actual work environment under supervision. Prerequisites: Sociology major, senior standing, 3.0 or higher GPA in Sociology courses, sociology instructor¡s and field supervisor¡s permission obtained one semester prior to internship.

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SPANISH (SPAN)

Humanities Department

SPAN 101 Beginning Conversational Spanish I     5 hours
Fundamental skills of reading, writing, speaking, listening. Offered Fall. G.E.

SPAN 102 Beginning Conversational Spanish II     5 hours
Continuation of SPAN 101. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 or instructor's permission. Offered Spring. G.E.

SPAN 110 Spanish for Medical Personnel     3 hours
Introduction to Spanish grammar with emphasis on basic communication; vocabulary for hospital use; knowledge of cultural characteristics of Spanish-speaking groups within the U.S. Occasional offering.

SPAN 111 Spanish for Law Enforcement Personnel     3 hours
Introduction to Spanish grammar for basic communication; emphasis on law enforcement terminology, legal instructions. Introduction to cultural characteristics and heritage of Spanish-speaking groups within the U.S. Occasional offering.

SPAN 112 Spanish for Social-Service Workers     3 hours
Introduction to Spanish grammar with emphasis on basic communication; vocabulary emphasizes social problems, government aid to the disadvantaged, medical health, diet, and problems of consumers. Occasional offering.

SPAN 203 Intermediate Spanish I     3 hours
Review of fundamentals and further study of intermediate-level vocabulary, grammar, conversation, and composition. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or instructor's permission. Offered even Fall.

SPAN 204 Intermediate Spanish II     3 hours
Continuation of SPAN 203. Prerequisite: SPAN 203 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Spring.

SPAN 233 Topics     1-3 hours

SPAN 255, 256, 355, 356, 455, 456 Directed Study     1-3 hours
Individual students meet with the instructor to carry out a prearranged program of specialized study.

SPAN 305 Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition     3 hours
Intensive study of comprehension, pronunciation, and grammar, with brief written compositions and oral dialogues. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 or instructor's permission. Offered odd Fall.

SPAN 306 Commercial Spanish     3 hours
Composition of Spanish business correspondence; translating technical writing and commercial documents; documentary credits; international business transactions. Prerequisite: SPAN 305 or instructor's permission. Offered even Spring.

SPAN 433 Topics     1-3 hours

SPAN 499 Internship     1-12 hours
Qualified students have the opportunity to work during the summer months in an international trade setting. Occasional offering.

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TUTORING

_ _ 225 Tutoring     .5 - 3 hours

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